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gimp 2.4.1 released

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GIMP

GIMP is the GNU Image Manipulation Program. It is a freely distributed piece of software suitable for such tasks as photo retouching, image composition and image authoring. This is a major buxfix release.

Although not officially announced on gimp.org as of yet, gimp 2.4.1 is listed as released on freshmeat.net and is available on gimp's ftp site as well as mirror sites.

Gimp's Download Page

GIMP @ Freshmeat

gimp.org




Officially Announced

Changes in GIMP 2.4.1
=====================

- fixed a minor display rendering problem
- improved the workaround for broken graphics card drivers (bug #421466)
- fixed a crash with broken scripts and plug-ins (bug #490055)
- fixed potential syntax error in configure script (bug #490068)
- fixed parsing of floating point numbers in Script-Fu (bug #490198)
- fixed potential crash when converting an indexed image to RGB (bug #490048)
- update the histogram while doing color corrections (bug #490182)
- fixed another crash with broken plug-ins (bug #490617)
- fixed problems on Win32 when GIMP is installed into a non-ASCII path
- fixed handling of truncated ASCII PNM files (bug #490827)
- make sure that there's always a cursor, even for small brushes (bug #491272)
- fixed line-drawing with a tablet and the Shift key (bug #164240)
- added code to use the system monitor profile on OS X (bug #488170)
- show changes to the rounded corners in the Rectangle Select tool (bug #418284)
- reduced rounding errors in the display render routines (bug #490785)
- translation updates (ca, de, et, lt, mk, pa, sv)

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