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Novell offers Windows to Linux migration

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Software

In a bid to entice enterprises to transfer core workgroup services from Windows or NetWare over to Linux, Novell today unveiled an enhanced version of its Open Enterprise Server which features improved migration functionality.

The Support Pack 1 platform is designed to help firms move key workgroup services, including file and print, to Linux all at once or gradually.

In addition to simplified migration, Novell has upgraded the latest version of its Open Enterprise Server with the addition of its iFolder 3.0 file sharing, access and backup application.

The platform also features a higher performance release of Novell's Storage Services running on Linux.

The Novell Client for Linux is also available in Open Enterprise Server to extend the functionality of Linux desktops with processes such as secure authentication, access to services and automatic drive mapping, which had previously been available only in Windows environments.

"Open Enterprise Server lets customers use integrated upgrading and migration utilities to easily and cost effectively select the platform mix that is best suited to their needs," said David Patrick, vice president and general manager of Linux open source platforms and services at Novell.

Open Enterprise Server Support Pack 1 will be available from Novell's support website at the end of August.

The upgrade will be free to existing customers, and available through Novell's channel at upgrade pricing for those migrating from competitive platforms. More information and details can be found here.

Source.

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