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Texas Gaming Festival: Quick Peek at the LAN Party

Filed under
Gaming

"The Texas Gaming festival is a successful LAN event that has been taking place in Dallas, Texas for the past few years. Over the years, it has become one of the top most visited and sponsored LAN events in the nation with attendance easily surpassing the 500-attendee attendance. This year was no different. In fact, this was perhaps the most successful attempt at a LAN event especially when ATI decided to launch its X850 XT PE 512MB graphics card officially."

"While ATI failed to disclose any significant details about the X850 XT PE 512MB, it did theorize the performance numbers. ATI actually had a display board that tested the latest PC games and according to the graphics card maker, a gamer would notice as much as 20 percent to 50 percent of performance boost at higher quality settings (1600x1200, 6xAA, 16xAF) just by doubling the on-board RAM.

While ATI was brave enough to display their 512MB version, NVIDIA, on the other hand, is also rumored to announce a similar card soon. We are fairly certain that it will just be a "technology preview", but image of the prototype cards have already started to appear. We are, however, expecting 512MB cards to hit the retail channel sometime in summer."

Full Report.

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