Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat bangs security drum

Filed under
Linux

Banging the security drum at the Linuxworld tradeshow in San Francisco Red Hat today unveiled an initiative dubbed Security in a Networked World.

As part of the programme, the Linux vendor unveiled its Red Hat Certificate System which is based on software that allows organisations to manage security certificates that are used to sign emails or authenticate users for online banking applications. It also supports authentication through the use of smart cards.

Red Hat has also worked with the Apache foundation to add support for the Firefox browser and the Thunderbird email client through the use of Apache's open source Network Security Service Libraries.

The collaboration will allow users of both systems to send and receive authenticated emails with Thunderbird, while organisations including online banks and web stores can use the system to authenticate users through smartcards in combination with Firefox.

The certificate system follows the launch of the Red Hat's identity server last June. Both applications are based on the iPlanet software that Red Hat acquired from AOL last year.

Other than the directory server however, Red Hat is not open sourcing the certificate system.

Product manager Mike Ferris told vnunet.com that Red Hat plans to open source the software at some point, but he declined to give a projected release date.

"We want to make sure that we have a well established user community as well several of the key customers. We want to work with them so we have a correct path towards open sourcing," Ferris said.

The certificate system will be available immediately at a fee of $6 per managed certificate.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT vs. Intel Core i9 10900K Linux Gaming Performance

Following the 130+ benchmarks of the AMD Ryzen 3000XT series earlier in the week looking at the CPU/system performance on Ubuntu Linux, here is our first look at the Linux gaming performance with putting the Ryzen 9 3900XT up head-to-head against the Intel Core i9 10900K. This Linux gaming bout is looking at the Core i9 10900K vs. Ryzen 9 3900XT for Linux gaming while also looking at the CPU power consumption and performance-per-Watt. Read more

Programming Leftovers

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • IT careers: How to get a job as a DevOps professional

    Editor’s note: In this ongoing series for IT job hunters, we'll explore in-demand roles, necessary skills, and how to stand out in an interview. Here, Pete Sosnowski, co-founder and VP people at Zety, shares insights on getting a DevOps role.

  • Nest With Fedora CfP open

    In a normal year, we’d be getting ready for my favorite event: Flock to Fedora. But as we’re all aware, this is anything but a normal year. Despite this—or perhaps because of this—we still want to bring the community together to share ideas, make plans, and form the bonds that put the Friends in Fedora. Instead of Flocking to Fedora, we’re going to Nest With Fedora. I’m happy to announce that the Call for Participation is now open. Nest With Fedora features five tracks. I included a few examples for each one, but don’t limit yourself. What do you want to share with the Fedora community?

  • Performance and usability enhancements in Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2

    Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 is now available. For the improvements in this release, we focused on performance and configuration, plus updating CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 to use newer versions of the most popular runtimes and stacks. We also added the ability to allocate only the CPU that you need for IDE plugins, and we introduced a new diagnostic feature that lets you start up a workspace in debug mode. CodeReady Workspaces 2.2 is available on OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift 4.3 and higher, including tech-preview support for OpenShift 4.5.

  • What does the future hold for edge computing?

    That being said, edge computing is still in its infancy and not quite ready for primetime yet. Gartner’s report admitted as much, noting that just 10 percent of enterprise data was generated and processed at the edge in 2018. For “the edge” to become as ubiquitous as “the cloud” in the tech industry, a myriad of technical challenges will need to be tackled. These include the development of compact devices with outsized processing power, the creation of software that enables companies to remotely monitor and update a limitless number of edge devices from across the world and new security technology and protocols to keep everything safe. Many companies are actively working to solve these problems, including Red Hat, Nutanix and Cloudera, all of which have developed their own edge technology. We recently spoke with senior leaders at each to learn what the future holds for edge computing — and what it will take to realize it.

  • Red Hat: Migrating To The Cloud And The Risk Of Sticking With The Status Quo

    The ability for companies to immediately respond to the need to support a work-from-home environment depended, in large part, upon where those firms were already in terms of their digitization journeys. For some, the shift was relatively easy, thanks to an existing embrace of cloud-based platforms and systems. For others, not so much: Continued reliance on legacy infrastructure, which itself often depends on manual intervention to function properly, created a panic for some companies unable to make the move to remote working without major roadblocks. Speaking with PYMNTS, Tim Hooley, chief technologist, EMEA, FSI at Red Hat, explained why organizations continue to delay their cloud migrations, and offered a guide to overcoming the sense of being overwhelmed and making progress in the journey toward fully automated back offices.