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Are You 'Gutsy' Enough to Replace Your OS with Linux?

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Linux

One thing is clear with new Linux distros such as Ubuntu's just-released "Gutsy Gibbon", or version 7.10, and openSUSE's 10.3, nipping at Windows' and Mac OS X's heels: The desktop OS is at a crossroads.

The Windows vs. Mac debate winds on, but as desktop apps become less critical to everyday computing with Web apps gearing up, the OS, er, platform, becomes less relevant.

And who does not like Free? Free OSes, free office suites and more galore make Linux look like a winner.

However, what's less clear, despite mainstream reports suggesting Linux has come of age, is whether this adolesecent desktop OS is right for everyday computer
users' homes.

It is a big leap for non-techies to replace Windows or Mac OS outright with Linux. And that is understood by groups pushing Linux on the desktop. Ubuntu can be run in full by booting from CD first and offers a partitioner, but openSUSE takes the cake between them on making partitioning a no-brainer, recognizing the Windows install -- almost as well as Apple's BootCamp.

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