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An OS for the Rest of Us: PC-BSD

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Reviews
BSD

I've always been a fan of alternative operating systems. I can't help it. It's in my blood for some reason. So I decided to give PC-BSD a shot and I came away very pleasantly surprised.

What is PC-BSD?

Before we get into the review, here are some highlights from the PC-BSD site discussing PC-BSD and its requirements. For a comprehensive look at what's in this release, see the changelog and the release notes on the PC-BSD site.

Highlights of this release:

* Moving the FreeBSD base version to 6-STABLE
* Xorg 7.2
* KDE 3.5.7
* Compiz-Fusion 0.5.2
* Support for Flash7 in native BSD browsers. (Konq, Opera, Firefox)
* Official NVIDIA drivers to simplify activating Hardware acceleration.

Minimum system requirements:

* Pentium II or higher
* 256MB Ram
* 4GB of free Hard Drive space (Either partition, or entire disk)
* Network card
* Sound card

Now I know that some of you are probably very skeptical about the idea of using BSD as your desktop operating system. Maybe you've never heard of it. Maybe you have heard of it but have heard that it's not very user-friendly or that the software is hard to install or manage. Put aside whatever preconceptions you have about PC-BSD because you're in for a real treat—if you're in the market for a new operating system.

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