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Ubuntu

Sucks!
83% (1706 votes)
Rocks!
17% (355 votes)
Total votes: 2061

Check this link

http://beranger.org/index.php?page=diary&2007/10/09/15/13/10-ubuntu-vs-debian-graphically-exp

A Step In The Right Direction...

For me Ubuntu is a step in the right direction for Linux. Anything that gets Linux noticed and make people aware that there is an alternative to Microsoft and Apple, I will be happy with that. Sure, Ubuntu is not a "one size fits all" distro and some have a good experience and some have a bad experience. I have never had a bad experience with Ubuntu and I have 7.10 running on a machine for the last 4 weeks with all the eye candy enabled and I am impressed. Instead of knocking it (like most seem to do) it should be applauded for what it has achieved in a very short amount of time whether you use it or not.

Yes indeed :)

I do have to agree it is nice to see that it seems to become a spear-head as regards getting noticed, a fresh distro and the fact that it's now coming with all the nice things compiz makes peoples heads turn. I remember reading a blog where someone was asked if they were running Vista whilst on their upto date box which made me chuckle.
It is a solid distro and I am impressed when I have seen some very nice setups that it has. Seems that they seem to be swallowing up the linux noobies with their supportive forums. (Obviouysly a more friendly install than gentoo so is a very nice start for those who either want a smooth experience or to try out linux)
I tend to defer people to Kubuntu whenever I get asked about Linux, even though I have no experience in using it and I tend to be surprised as to how quickly people seem to be up and running with 3d accelerateion and all on their box.

Side note but my physics degree course now requires some level of being able to linux. It has helped raise awareness of some of my friends as to how good it is. Surprising that I am overhearing coversations among my peers about Linux between lectures.
But there is always the comment of I log into windows to log into linux which always seems to confuse people, but I guess it seems good way of introducing people to it.

Not a fan

At the risk of sounding like I am having a dig at ubuntu I tried kubuntu for a week or so a few months ago and ended up reinstalling openSuSE after using it.
It seems fantastic for basic users and people new to Linux, but didn't agree with me personally.

I think of myself as a set in my way linux user now so I expect things to work the way I am used to so maybe I wasn't liking the small learning curve moving to a deb based system.

I guess everybody has their favourite distro and (k)ubuntu just wasn't for me.
People go on about rpm but I find it less confusing than deb myself, even though through the likes of yum and apt it's a lot easier now.

Still I know someone who uses it regularly and swears it's the best distro out there.

I must admit I am impressed how it seemed to appear from nowhere to become a very important and influential project in a short amount of time.

I did like the way that it used sudo a lot and a few other distro's seem to be setup to encourage that over the root account a bit more I am feeling, but living without a root account seems strange to me...

More in Tux Machines

More about those zero-dot users

Yesterday’s article about KDE’s target users generated some interesting discussions about the zero-dot users. One of the most insightful comments I read was that nobody can really target zero-dot users because they operate based on memorization and habit, learning a series of cause-effect relationships: “I click/touch this picture/button, then something useful happens”–even with their smartphones! So even if GNOME and ElementaryOS might be simpler, that doesn’t really matter because it’s not much harder to memorize a random-seeming sequence of clicks or taps in a poor user interface than it is in a good one. I think there’s a lot of truth to this perspective. We have all known zero-dot users who became quite proficient at specific tasks; maybe they learned how to to everything they needed in MS Office, Outlook, or even Photoshop. The key detail is that these folks rely on the visual appearance and structure of the software remaining the same. When the software’s user interface changes–even for the better–they lose critical visual cues and reference points and they can’t find anything anymore. Read more

Distros Without Systemd (New List) and Trolling Against GNU/Linux

Videos/Shows: Deepin, Free Software, GTK, KDE, and More

Ubuntu: Internet of Things (IoT), CyberDog, ZeroDown, and OVS (Open vSwitch)

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  • CyberDog: a four legged robot revolution with Ubuntu

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  • ZeroDown® Software Targets Open Source with New Canonical Partnership

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  • Data centre networking: what is OVS? | Ubuntu

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