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13 reasons why Linux should be on your desktop

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In 13 Reasons why Linux won't make it to a desktop near you, we reviewed Linux as a marketing case study. In this piece, we take a good look at the product to find out why it has thrived despite its troubled childhood.

A couple of years ago, the Linux Desktop was a pimply adolescent with half-baked ideas. Today we see a handsome, well-dressed grown-up who handles a range of tasks with confidence and even performs fancy tricks. No longer need we make allowances for his dress sense or his strange habits.

The timing couldn't be better since Vista is a Wagner Opera that is usually late to start, takes too long to finish, and is spoilt by floorboards creaking under the weight of the cast. Mac OS X Leopard is the late show in an exclusive nightclub where the drinks are always too expensive. Linux Desktop is the free show in the park across the street -- it imposes some discomforts on the audience but provides plenty of entertainment.

The first challenge is getting hold of tickets

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More in Tux Machines

Learning The Linux File System

Before we get started, let’s avoid any confusion. There are two meanings to the term “File System” in the wonderful world of computing: First, there is the system of files and the directory structure that all of your data is stored in. Second, is the format scheme that is used to write data on mass storage devices like hard drives and SSD’s. We are going to be talking about the first kind of file system here because the average user will interact with his or her file system every time they use a computer, the format that data is written in on their storage devices is usually of little concern to them. The many different file systems that can be used on storage is really only interesting to hardware geeks and is best saved for another discussion. Now that that’s cleared up, we can press on. (Read the rest at Freedom Penguin)

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FreeNAS 10 Enters Alpha, Brings Lots of New Technologies, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

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