Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

tuxmachines 2nd quarter report

Filed under
Site News

This second quarter has been very exciting for me. The hits have continued to grow each month and we've had some great community contributions in the forms of articles and comments. Meanies still plague the site, but I've had a wonderful time reviewing distros and posting news links.

Pure ddos attackes have subsided somewhat since I turned off the mail server, however comment spammers have been hitting the site pretty hard. One day it went on all day long, and sometimes they hit so hard and fast it amounts to a dos. I turned off anonymous posting to keep their spam from showing up but turning off comments completely don't stop their attempts. This can be very frustrating and if I was paying per kilobyte, I'd be very angry. Spammers should be shot on the spot - no cigarette, no last request, no blindfold. As a result of having to turn off the mail server, new members and node subscribers may have noticed their notifications delayed. I have the mail server set up to come on for a few seconds every so often to get that mail pushed out. I apologize for these delays, but it does help keep the site up more consistantly.

So, the hits on the main site (not counting the gallery) for the second quarter look like so:

2005-07 192514
2005-06 167216
2005-05 137881

We want to thank those community members who have contributed articles to tuxmachines this quarter. In case you missed them, the contributed articles to tuxmachines this quarter include:

One wonderful addition to the site was Texstar's Linux 101 series, with contributions by atang1. Many of my readers subscribe to or rss Texstar's blog as well. We hope to be seeing more of this distinguished and respected community member here on tuxmachines. We miss him. His distro keeps him pretty busy though.

I have reviewed several distros and movies. Some highlights include SymphonyOS Alpha 3 and Alpha 4, Mandriva 2006 Beta 1, and PCLOS Pre-9.

Regulars might notice I tend to favor those distros that are new or more unpublicized. Those are the one's I'm curious about. There's no end to the reviews on the big guys, so I don't have to install them to see what they have, how well they function or what they look like. I can just read someone else's review. Some new or more obscure distros that really impressed me include (but are not limited to): KateOS, Underground Desktop, Frugalware, Litrix, Astrumi, and PC-BSD.

I haven't had as much time to go to the movies lately, but I didn't really like War of the Worlds or XXX: State of the Union. Perhaps the run of bad movies also contributed to my sudden lack of interest in going.

Tuxmachines is always open to community contributions, so if you have written or would like to write a howto, review, opinion piece, whatever and need somewhere to feature it, give us a hollar or just submit it as news. You could even start you own blog as the very distinguished taran did or the always interesting brockenlife did. We hope to see more of these fine gentlemen as well.

Tuxmachines may soon be looking for a co-editor to help scour the internet for interesting linux and computer/technology related news for the morning shift. I anticipate a drastic change in my real life working schedule soon and may need someone to take this most important position. More info and requirements to be announced in a future posting as the time and need approaches, or if you are interested, please drop me a line.

I can't thank my readers enough for visiting my humble site and I especially want to thank my two most consistant supporters: PCLinuxOnline.com and DistroWatch.com, without whom tuxmachines would be nothing.

I also want to thank the other sites that link to my original articles. It's an honor and privilege to find my links upon your pages. These include but are not limited to lobby4linux, capnkirby, guilinux and licklinux.

The summer months seem to be a slow period for distro and movie releases. Hopefully we'll have an even more exciting next quarter. Thanks everyone and here's a virtual champagne toast to you all.

More in Tux Machines

Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.