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OpenSuse 10.3 Has Its Good Points

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SUSE

Last week I posted a harsh review about OpenSuse 10.3, but I also pointed out that there were some good things about it. Here is a quick summary of what I enjoyed during my excursion with this GNU/Linux distribution. If I had a laptop, I would be running OpenSuse on it.

Artwork

The artwork in OpenSuse 10.3 was one of the main reasons I decided to try it out. The wallpaper, the splash screen, and the bootup logo is just stunning. I really like the contrast that the green color creates. Also the color makes the desktop look more professional, unlike a certain brown scheme.

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OpenSUSE 10.3 and ThinkPad Hot Keys

I’ve been playing around a bit more since last night with OpenSUSE and also worked out why displaymanager-gtk was making a right dog’s dinner of matters on the current Gutsy beta–the ati driver no longer supports Xinerama or dual screens (it in fact doesn’t support XrandR 1.2 but that’s technical.)

I like it, it looks be default a lot nicer than Ubuntu IMHO with it’s Oranges and Browns (like a 1970s boudoir of sorts), with its greens and blues. I haven’t tweaked the font display yet as that still looks a bit gruesome compared to my tweaked Ubuntu settings, and Windows XP/Vista’s ClearType.

My biggest issue though is it has made a huge mess of the ThinkPad keys/Fn keys.

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(Also on same blog: Ubuntu Gutsy and ThinkPad Hot Keys)

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