Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

NVIDIA GeForce 7800GTX + 1.0-7675 Driver Preview

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Within a few hours, NVIDIA is expected to release their new set of display drivers (1.0-7675). Among other improvements, these new drivers should correct a majority of the problems that previously plagued the 7800GTX Linux performance. Some such problems were the 2D/3D clock switch not operating properly and the GPU not being able to surpass the 415MHz mark. Although in our testing we were using an early build of the 1.0-7675 x86_64 drivers, we're pleased to say these issues are no longer a problem. The G70 immediately scaled up to 468MHz; past the 430MHz reference mark. This article is in continuation of our previous piece entitled the NVIDIA GeForce 7800GTX Linux Preview. The 6600GT and 7800GTX 1.0-7667 benchmark results were obtained from the previous article as no hardware or software changes had occurred to this testbed except for the driver upgrade. Below are the system components once again that we used during testing.

Hardware Components

Processor: AMD Athlon 64 3000+ (Winchester)
Motherboard: Tyan Tomcat K8E (S2865AG2NRF)
Memory: 2 x 512MB OCZ EL PC-3200 Titanium
Hard Drives: 160GB Western Digital SATA 7200RPM
Optical Drives: Lite-On 16x DVD-ROM & Lite-On 52x CD-RW
Add-On Devices: NetGear WAG311 802.11g & Chaintech AV-710
Case: Sytrin Nextherm ICS-8200
Power Supply: Sytrin 460W (ActivePFC)

Software Components

Operating System: FedoraCore4
Linux Kernel: 2.6.12-1.1398
GCC (GNU Compiler): 4.0.0
Xorg 6.8.2

Full Review.

More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Distribution Updated With KDE 3.5 Forked Desktop

Q4OS 1.2 "Orion" is the new release that is re-based on Debian Jessie, focused on shipping its own desktop utilities and customizations, and designed to run on both old and new hardware. Read more

Atom Shell is now Electron

Atom Shell is now called Electron. You can learn more about Electron and what people are building with it at its new home electron.atom.io. Read more Also: C++ Daddy Bjarne Stroustrup outlines directions for v17

A Fedora 22 beta walk-through

The new Fedora, with its GNOME 3.16 interface, is an interesting, powerful Linux desktop. Read more Also: Web software center for Fedora Red Hat's Cross-Selling and Product Development Will Power Long-Term Growth Red Hat Updates Open Source Developer and Admin Tools

Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false. Read more Also: Anti-Systemd People