Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Your First Computer

ForCheapnGood, there was Kaypro

First was a Kaypro II, later had a IV, a couple of 10's and a 2. First DOS cripple was a CLUB 286. Lousy chip and OS but great company. Instruction Manual said first get a screwdriver and take off the hood - it won't hurt. Refreshing versus typical IBM think of don't worry about what's in there, and if you must then call a geek to do it.

Still remember those massive spreadsheets we could build with only 64K before we "upgraded" to DOS and lost the ability to swap pages. 640K, my aching ....

And now we have windows (from Xerox to Apple to MSoft and not an honest payment anywhere) so we cling to DOS to get work done and welcome windows for the net. Is Linux really a hope for the world?

RememberGaryKildahlin your prayers

Hmm...

The first computer my family had was an 80-86 Mom used to do finances on. I played Amy's Primer on it for hours.

My first real computer, though, was a 286 running some flavor of MS-DOS (5.0, I think) back in 1992. I had a lot of fun with that machine. My parents got it secondhand, and it had a few games on it as well as a few documents. I loved that thing, and really wish that I had made them keep it around. I'd love to program for it today.

__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

You old-timers are impressive

My first PC experience was with my dad's Apple ][, which he bought to run VisiCalc. An Epson MX-80 dot-matrix printer and a 2nd floppy drive soon followed, as he got more software. But that was his baby. Business only.

(Amazingly enough, it included the computer's schematic diagram in the manual. No wonder there were clones.)

I didn't buy my own PC until 1992, right after Win3.1 came out. The thing about Win3.1 is that you were really supposed to run setup (including video driver setup) from the DOS level, but there was an applet that (supposedly) let you change video drivers from within Windows.

The day we got the thing home and set up, without knowing much of anything about it, I changed the video driver from within Windows and ended up with a black screen. Panic time! The wife's due back in 2 hours! What will she say? Time to reinstall! Uh-oh, that didn't work!

Some MS tech support guy named Ray stayed on the line with me for what seemed like an hour, and got it working just as my wife walked in the door.

That was the first and last time MS telephone support was any help to me -- but not the last time I borked a computer! Not long after that, my wife bought me a Mac. Smile

Apple II Clone Built on PC Boards in Toronto!

It was 1980 and throughout Toronto parts kits, pc boards and cases were available to put together Apple II clones. Down to the right keyboards. (Yes the power supply got too hot.)

I soldered mine together and it came up first time to the glories of Steve Woziak's Apple basic. Then I soldered the disk controller together and got Apple OS working and then a Microsoft CPM card was soldered together and got CP-M working.

Yes my wife of the time thought I was a geek soldering this thing together on the kitchen table and programing the Eprom's at my first engineering job.

Hasta Le Vista Baby!

Sinclair ZX81

Oh the joys of having a 2 colour, no sound and only 1K of memory computer. For Christmas I had a 16K expansion pack for it and a new game based on the Alien movie, pure bliss Big Grin

I then had a Commodore Vic20 (3.5K with 8 colours), a Commodore 64, then an Amiga A500, then an Amiga A1200 (had a SCSI internal hard drive and 1MB of memory), an Atari 520ST, then I sold both my Amiga's and ST and bought an Olivetti 486 DX2 66 which cost me £1300 and came with DOS 6.22 and Windows 3.11 for playgroups Wink All this so I could play Day of the Tenticle (which turned out to be an expensive game as the PC had no sound card or CD, which I had to purchase at a cost of £200).

ZX Specturm 128K

The first computer I laid my hands on was the fantastic ZX Spectrum -- with massive 128K RAM Wink and my first useful program was a sprite animation one.

1982 ish?

It was a speccy! My brother won it in a raffle at school IIRC.

Atari 400

I started with an Atari 400 with flat membrane keyboard and cassette tape drive which I quickly traded for an Atari 800 and later an Atari 800XL and a 810 diskdrive. Later I added a massive 10mb MFM BTL hard drive system and ran a bbs on it.

1980

My first machine was a Commodore Vic 20 in 1980, then the Commodore 64 in 1982.

Then in 1985, I got the Apple II c with a 300 baud modem, but soon upgraded to a blistering fast 1200 baud modem... ahhh memories... we had Myspace then, it was just called a BBS. Anyone remember the Atlanta Penitentiary BBS?

good times, good times..

rel.

Don't remember what year it was

but my first was an Atari 800

This poll brought back memories

Yes it was 1988... I purchased a Commodore Amiga 500 for over 1000.00 CAD and that didnt even have a hard drive. But it had 512k of RAM. Great computer for gaming and general word processing. It lasted till 1993 when I bought my first PC.

---------------------------------------

ReviewLinux.Com - http://www.reviewlinux.com

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Interacting with the Pootle Bot on Gerrit

    Have you received “A polite ping, still working on this bug?” message on one of your Gerrit submissions? You can simply send an arbitrary reply to avoid the patch being abandoned within a month. Here we discuss more about Pootle bot, which is one of the QA (Quality Assurance) tools for the LibreOffice QA team to manage old submissions.

  • Optimizing your QML application for compilation to C++

    This is the start of a series of posts where I'm going to share some insights on how to adjust a QML application to get the most out of qmlsc, the QML Script Compiler. In contrast to previous posts, I won't talk about the abstract architecture or the high level picture.

  • Compiling QML to C++: Annotating JavaScript functions

    This is the second installment in the series on how to adjust your QML application to take the maximum advantage of qmlsc. In the first post we've set up the environment and taken an initial measurement. I highly recommend reading that one first.

  • PaloAlto init-cfg.txt Bootstrap Config file Layout with Examples

    When you install and configure the PaloAlto firewall, when the firewall boots up for the first time, it does the bootstrapping process. PaloAlto uses the settings defined in the bootstrap files, including the init-cfg.txt and bootstrap.xml under the config folder to configure the initial state of the firewall.

  • $30 compact multi-sensor board works with any microcontroller with I2C (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    SENSE is a compact multi-sensor board supporting measurement of air quality, sound, light intensity, temperature, proximity, etc… and designed by Zack Seifert, a seventeen-year-old electronics enthusiast and president of his school’s robotics team.

  • I will just quickly do a blog post...

    I got ”inspired” by my writing of the previous blog post, and wrote in a channel about my experience some time ago. So why not also do a blog post about doing a blog post :) So… I was planning to use GitLab’s Pages feature via my Hugo fork as usual to push it through. So like, concentrate on writing and do a publish, right, like in good old times? I did so, but all I got both locally and in remote pipeline was stuff like…

  • Rust: A Critical Retrospective

    Since I was unable to travel for a couple of years during the pandemic, I decided to take my new-found time and really lean into Rust. After writing over 100k lines of Rust code, I think I am starting to get a feel for the language and like every cranky engineer I have developed opinions and because this is the Internet I’m going to share them. The reason I learned Rust was to flesh out parts of the Xous OS written by Xobs. Xous is a microkernel message-passing OS written in pure Rust. Its closest relative is probably QNX. Xous is written for lightweight (IoT/embedded scale) security-first platforms like Precursor that support an MMU for hardware-enforced, page-level memory protection. In the past year, we’ve managed to add a lot of features to the OS: networking (TCP/UDP/DNS), middleware graphics abstractions for modals and multi-lingual text, storage (in the form of an encrypted, plausibly deniable database called the PDDB), trusted boot, and a key management library with self-provisioning and sealing properties. One of the reasons why we decided to write our own OS instead of using an existing implementation such as SeL4, Tock, QNX, or Linux, was we wanted to really understand what every line of code was doing in our device. For Linux in particular, its source code base is so huge and so dynamic that even though it is open source, you can’t possibly audit every line in the kernel. Code changes are happening at a pace faster than any individual can audit. Thus, in addition to being home-grown, Xous is also very narrowly scoped to support just our platform, to keep as much unnecessary complexity out of the kernel as possible.

  • Huang: Rust: A Critical Retrospective

    Andrew 'bunnie' Huang has posted an extensive review of the Rust language derived from the experience of writing "over 100k lines" of code.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 443
  • Caolán McNamara: Dark Style Preference with GTK

    Added something to track the org.freedesktop.appearance.color-scheme property as used by the GNOME 42 Dark Style Preference setting. Screencast recorded with the new iteration of GNOME's screen built-in recorder which is quite snazzy.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (microcode_ctl, rubygem-nokogiri, and vim), Mageia (htmldoc, python-django, and python-oslo-utils), Red Hat (container-tools:2.0, kernel, kernel-rt, kpatch-patch, and pcs), SUSE (ardana-barbican, grafana, openstack-barbican, openstack-cinder, openstack-heat-gbp, openstack-horizon-plugin-gbp-ui, openstack-ironic, openstack-keystone, openstack-neutron-gbp, python-lxml, release-notes-suse-openstack-cloud, autotrace, curl, firefox, libslirp, php7, poppler, slurm_20_11, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (bind9, gnome-control-center, and libxrandr).

  • Apple Safari, Microsoft Windows 11 & Teams, Hacked During $800,000 0-Day Fest [Ed: Microsoft puts back doors in its things, so security is never the goal, nor is it accomplished]
  • Red Hat Kubernetes security report finds people are the problem

    Kubernetes, despite being widely regarded as an important technology by IT leaders, continues to pose problems for those deploying it. And the problem, apparently, is us. The open source container orchestration software, being used or evaluated by 96 per cent of organizations surveyed [PDF] last year by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, has a reputation for complexity. Witness the sarcasm: "Kubernetes is so easy to use that a company devoted solely to troubleshooting issues with it has raised $67 million," quipped Corey Quinn, chief cloud economist at IT consultancy The Duckbill Group, in a Twitter post on Monday referencing investment in a startup called Komodor. And the consequences of the software's complication can be seen in the difficulties reported by those using it.

  • CISA Releases Analysis of FY21 Risk and Vulnerability Assessments | CISA

    CISA has released an analysis and infographic detailing the findings from the 112 Risk and Vulnerability Assessments (RVAs) conducted across multiple sectors in Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21).

  • ISC Releases Security Advisory for BIND

    The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) has released a security advisory that addresses a vulnerability affecting version 9.18.0 of ISC Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND). A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to cause a denial-of-service condition.

  • CVE-2022-1183: Destroying a TLS session early causes assertion failure

    An assertion failure can be triggered if a TLS connection to a configured http TLS listener with a defined endpoint is destroyed too early.

Videos/Shows: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9, The Linux Link Tech Show, Bad Voltage, and BSD Now

today's howtos

  • GNU Linux (distro independent) – how to set fixed ip (brute force overwrite) – temporarily (also possible for DNS)

    this is a quick bash hack, to set an additional fixed ip to the user’s interface, this will (brute force) OVERWRITE all mess done by network managers of various origins: (there should be only one config file to config network settings and it is: /etc/network/interfaces, instead of 10x entities inventing it’s own standard, confusing the heck out of users, just keep the standard that is already there?)

  • How to Enable More Multi-Touch Gestures in Ubuntu 22.04 GNOME 42 | UbuntuHandbook

    This simple tutorial shows how to enable 3-finger & 4-finger multi-touch gestures in Ubuntu 22.04, Fedora 36 and other Linux with GNOME 40+, while the desktop by default supports only few gestures.

  • How to Install Open Source osTicket on Ubuntu 20.04

    A server can contain many important business applications. These applications can help us to deploy even a support ticket system to better manage the technical service of a company. Today, you will learn how to install osTicket on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to Install and Use Bitwarden on Linux

    A password manager is an application that lets you generate new passwords and store existing ones securely. It eliminates the need to create and remember strong and complex passwords yourself for all your accounts. Depending on the device and operating system you're using, you can find all kinds of password managers. Bitwarden is a free-to-use password manager that comes with all the essential password management features. Follow along to learn how to install and set up Bitwarden on Linux.

  • How to install Borgmatic for easy Linux server backups | TechRepublic

    Do you have a reliable backup solution running on your Linux servers? If not, what’s your plan for disaster recovery? The word “disaster” alone should be enough to help you realize backups are an absolutely crucial part of your organization. If you’re in the market for a new Linux backup solution, there’s a lesser-known solution that does an outstanding job, and it’s fairly easy to install and configure. That solution is Borgmatic. This simple, configuration-driven backup solution protects your files (and even databases) with client-side encryption and even offers third-party integration for things like monitoring. I want to walk you through the process of installing Borgmatic on Ubuntu Server 22.04. When complete, you should feel confident your important data is regularly being backed up.

  • How to install the Caddy web server on Ubuntu Server 22.04 | TechRepublic

    Caddy is a powerful open-source web server, written in Go, that can be used to host web applications in a production environment. Caddy features built-in automated TLS certificate renewals, OSCP stapling, static file serving, reverse proxy, Kubernetes ingress and much more. Caddy can be run as a stand-alone web server, an app server or even within containers. In this tutorial, I’m going to walk you through the steps of installing Caddy on Ubuntu Server 22.04 and then how to create a simple, static site.