Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What Fedora needs is some direction - and online upgrades

Filed under
Linux

Some of the biggest problems I see in Fedora these days are the following:

1. Lack of direction

Since Fedora is a distribution for developers by developers in order to test out new technology, the main tree ends up being a hodge-podge of whatever each individual maintainer feels like working on. Unless there is an individual or small group of individuals that desires things to be a certain way, then you have to abide by those rules (take for example, no kmods in Fedora).

If Fedora had a better sense of what it should be doing it would polarize developers along the same path rather than everyone working for their own goals.

2. Upgrades aren't supported - All hail Anaconda - the great upgraderinstaller!

Fedora (and RHEL/CentOS) needs to be able to upgrade online, using a tool like yum (or smart, or apt - I don't really care which tool it is - right now it seems smart could handle it better than yum). Most of the other distros can do this without problems (Gentoo, Ubuntu, Debian).

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Hands-On with Tanglu 2.0 Bartholomea annulata

Tanglu GNU/Linux is a distribution based on Debian Testing. When I wrote recently about the future of Linux Mint Debian Edition and other distributions based on Debian Testing, what I was concerned about was the fact that they will be changing their base to Debian Stable in the near future. Tanglu has not given any indication that they intend to change, so this could be a good alternative for the future. Read more

Case study: Sky News turns to Red Hat for IT upgrade

The news never stops and Sky News must ensure its systems are always available and adaptable for changes to service provision. To ensure the scalability and resiliency of operations, the news organisation has deployed Red Hat Enterprise Virtualisation and Red Hat Satellite in two datacentres. The upgrade to IT infrastructure allows the firm to deliver flexible broadcasting and publishing. Read more

Did Cyanogen betray OnePlus for India?

This year kicked off with OnePlus and Cyanogen Inc announcing the OnePlus One invitation only device which created a buzz in the tech community, since then, relations have taken a downward turn and now the two companies are in a legal debacle over the Indian market. Back in February on the 28th, OnePlus and Cyanogen both signed a collaboration agreement and earlier on that month, on the 1st, they signed a trademark license agreement which is valid until 31st January 2016. These agreements meant that OnePlus was allowed a non-exclusive license to use Cyanogen trademarks and software worldwide except mainland China. Everything is OK up until September 2014. Read more

today's leftovers