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What Fedora needs is some direction - and online upgrades

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Linux

Some of the biggest problems I see in Fedora these days are the following:

1. Lack of direction

Since Fedora is a distribution for developers by developers in order to test out new technology, the main tree ends up being a hodge-podge of whatever each individual maintainer feels like working on. Unless there is an individual or small group of individuals that desires things to be a certain way, then you have to abide by those rules (take for example, no kmods in Fedora).

If Fedora had a better sense of what it should be doing it would polarize developers along the same path rather than everyone working for their own goals.

2. Upgrades aren't supported - All hail Anaconda - the great upgraderinstaller!

Fedora (and RHEL/CentOS) needs to be able to upgrade online, using a tool like yum (or smart, or apt - I don't really care which tool it is - right now it seems smart could handle it better than yum). Most of the other distros can do this without problems (Gentoo, Ubuntu, Debian).

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