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Most Anticipated Release

openSUSE 10.3
45% (271 votes)
Mandriva 2008
13% (76 votes)
*Ubuntu 7.10
33% (196 votes)
Fedora 8
6% (35 votes)
Gentoo 2007.1
4% (25 votes)
Total votes: 603

Not enough options

Where's the "yawn" option? That would get my vote.

re: not enough options

Well, you could always cast your yawn towards the Unoobtu choice - basically it's the same thing.

Unoobtu?

Now, now. I've just been dealing with some techie types over a new website-to-be. I ended up blowing my stack when the flow of work was interrupted for the second time in about 10 days by one of them calling for a new round of navel-gazing which undercut the whole basis of the project. None of them had the slightest comprehension of the impracticality of that whole modus operandi.

Deadlines? Oh yes, they make such a pleasant sound as they rush by. Public relations? What's 'public'? Promotion? Who cares if no one uses it as long as it's theoretically correct.

In desperation over the most prominent Foss office suite, I'm turning to KOffice. Please wish me luck.

Asterick...

I'm assuming that Linux Mint 3.1 Celena goes under Ubuntu. Even though it's based on 7.04, not 7.10.

re: Asterick...

that's already out tho ain't it? but yeah, anything *buntu derived...

openSUSE 10.3

openSUSE 10.3 out this Thursday, woo!

Anticipated release

To Vonskippy;

Agreed

These seem to be a rehash of existing systems with software updates posing as OS upgrades.

Such is life when a rapidly maturing OS is so good that upgrades represent a "technological improvement".

Oh well, I'll live with the shame Smile .

Cabs61

re: anticipated release

Never has a list held less excitement. It'd be different if any of these releases weren't destined to be just as bug ridden as their predecessors. Apparently there's no glamor in fixing problems - just creating new ones (as long as they come with new artwork, I guess we're supposed to be happy).

Please don't start

For those of you who love your stability, and find nothing lacking in the same packages you've used for years now, you still have your Debian Sarge. Just use it, and be happy. Why bother to needlessly bash the dedicated developers trying to make Linux a bit more approachable to the non-software-purists of the world. You can still have your secret club meetings...

re: please don't start.

godsoe wrote:

"Why bother to needlessly bash the dedicated developers trying to make Linux a bit more approachable to the non-software-purists of the world."

It's called "FEEDBACK", perhaps you've heard of it. It's where rational, real-world people, give their valid opinions on what's lacking with Linux in an attempt to garner a workable alternative to Windows.

The idea is to create a very tiny possibility that the Linux developers will start paying attention to real users instead of the drooling unwashed hordes of linux fanboys (or worse yet, themselves) and stop churning out release after release of the same old kibble.

The 6 month cycle of churn has turned into a "look at our cool new graphics and see how fresh our package list is" instead of focusing on actually producing a better (or gasp - more stable) OS.

Debian has a slightly better release approach, but their software "politics" and lukewarm management (aka the blind leading the stupid) means it's a no go for me.

RHEL (and it's growing herd of clones) seems to be a good mix of stability, reasonably current packages, and good management (as does, or so I hear, SUSE Enterprise).

So get your bandaids out (and your excuse/apology thesaurus), and enjoy your bleeding edge eye candy release, just don't say that's the BEST that Linux can be (and we should be happy about that).

Re: Debian

I've been using Debian as my main desktop OS for about 4 years now (currently using the "testing" branch). Its package management system is both simple and powerful, it's arguably better than anything RPM-based, and its package pool is so large there's rarely a need to go outside of it. In other words, I'm very satisfied with it.

Nobody involved with Debian is stupid. They're 99.9% developers. IMHO they either a) don't give a flying **** about being, or Cool simply have no clue know how to be, responsive to the needs of a wide user base -- or c) a bit of both. (The latest example is the NZ time zone fracas -- how many Debian users even knew there was a "volatile" repository?)

That's what you get when a distro the size of Debian has hardly anyone on its staff except for developers. That's why Ubuntu's become so popular in such a short amount of time.

Contrast that with openSUSE. Looks to me like openSUSE did improve its underlying OS with its latest release (e.g. in the area of package management). Too bad it's now owned by Novell, whose marketing geniuses are sucking up to Microsoft.

re: re: Debian

Perhaps I used a bad choice of metaphor's - instead of saying their management is akin to "the blind leading the stupid" I might have more accurately portrayed their management style (or lack there of) as "two straight guys having a serious discussion about fashion".

As you point out, they seem to be either clueless or just don't care about managing a project that has grown beyond their initial vision/scope.

That's fine for a hobby, but in the business world it's grow, get bought out (or sued in oblivion), or die. I think Debian needs to figure out which category they're shooting for.

And although apt-get is a good package manager, their ongoing repo/dependency problems tarnishes an otherwise slick system.

re: re: re: Debian

vonskippy wrote:
That's fine for a hobby, but in the business world it's grow, get bought out (or sued in oblivion), or die. I think Debian needs to figure out which category they're shooting for.

In Debian's case, it's "none of the above." Unlike Red Hat, Canonical, or Novell, Debian isn't owned or produced by a business, and so its main motivation as an organization isn't making money, it's producing a free OS. (That's something I greatly admire about it.)

I think "hobby" is a bad word to describe something as sophisticated as Debian. It's demeaning, as if you're comparing it to a 7-year-old's train set. I'm just a home desktop user, but from what I read, Debian is entirely suitable for use in a business setting.

(On a philosophical note, I'd also disagree that businesses always need to "grow or die" -- change, certainly, but IMO once your income reaches a certain level, the idea of "continual growth" is more a matter of greed and the way our culture defines success. If you want your business to be publicly-owned and -traded, you always have to make more money; that's the way the system is set up. But going that route is a choice, not a necessity.)

vonskippy wrote:
And although apt-get is a good package manager, their ongoing repo/dependency problems tarnishes an otherwise slick system.

What repo/dependency problems?

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