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Looking for Algae--the Next Voyage

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Misc

Algae is very important to our lives. It is estimated that 73% to 87% of the net global production of oxygen is produced by algae. It is at the bottom of the food chain. How does this fit in with computing?

Most of the readers of Linux Journal have at least one computer in their houses. I lost count of my own computer stock at about 15, and some of them are real electrical power-eaters. A lot of them have really dangerous chemicals in them, like lead and acidic materials. Fortunately, over time, power requirements per CPU and graphics cycles have gone down, as have costs for the hardware. Manufacturers, either through legislation or social and civic concern, have moved to making their systems from more environmentally-friendly components.

Unfortunately, we still have desktop systems today that are measured in the hundreds of Watts. My desktop machine has a power supply rated at 450 Watts, and I recently saw an IBM workstation rated at 850 Watts. Although it is true that these machines do not soak up that much power continuously, the power meter on the house does cycle quite fast when they are turned on.

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