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Linux Security - Is it Ready For The Average User?

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There seems to be a new important security patch out for Linux every month, lots of "do not use this program" warnings, too many articles and books with too little useful information, high-priced consultants, and plenty of talk about compromised systems. It is almost enough to send someone back to Windows. Can the average Linux user or system administrator keep his or her system secure and still have time to do other things? I am happy to say yes and here is how to do it.

The Five Keys To Locking Your Linux System Down

Really, there are only five things needed to keeping a Linux system secure. This goes for both servers and client systems -- desktops and laptops.

Full Article.

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