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Tiny Linux Redux

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Linux

"Recently, the CE Linux forum has been working to revive the Linux-tiny project," stated Tim Bird on the Linux Kernel mailing list, adding that Michael Opdenacker has been selected as the project's new primary maintainer.

The project's website explains: "The linux-tiny patchset is a series of patches against the 2.6 mainline Linux kernel to reduce its memory and disk footprint, as well as to add features to aid working on small systems. Target users are developers of embedded system and users of small or legacy machines such as 386s and handhelds."

Andrew Morton suggested that patches should be sent to him to be merged into his -mm tree, aiming for inclusion in the mainline kernel.

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Disagreement continued as to whether or not the BSD license allows the addition of new copyrights on unmodified or minimally modified code. Another disagreement was over the continued existence of improperly licensed files in developer source code repository histories from when BSD licensed files had been changed to the GPL, a problem since fixed.

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