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Review: Ark Linux H2O 2007.1

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Linux
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rk Linux is a distribution that strives to provide the end user with the easiest possible install and the greatest ease of use. Indirectly derived from Red Hat Linux, it really strives to set itself apart as the preferred distribution for the new user to Linux. But exactly how user friendly is Ark Linux? Is it friendly enough for a new user to use and install? Well, let's look at what it offers and what the desktop can do.

Installation

Upon booting up the install cd, I came across what I believe is a rather funny opening screen. Its not that it asks you how you want to install Ark, but rather it's the way they do the screen that's funny. The screen gives you a simple list of quick install, advanced install, and expert install. That's pretty typical of most distributions. The part that makes it so funny is what it does next. If you notice the screenshot below, Ark actually has the audacity to tell you how to use your mouse. That's the part I found funniest. But in an odd way, that can also be good because since they're targeted towards the new user, giving them a little nudge in the right direction can't hurt any.

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