Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Your Fav PC

cop this?

masalai

wherever you are clevo is the maker of what I have. for the fiddlers & upgraders try their amd with 2 x hdd (mine is 100g each, dual dvd drives, 4G ram & modest nvidia geforce go 7900 with 256mb feeding a 17inch 1920 x 1200 lcd screen plus your other little bits & pieces. Even when I could not afford a notebook and used a 'mini-tower' I found that I replaced before the need to tinker/upgrade the internals.

I have found the screen better on these aging eyes & even movies are OK with the note on my belly in bed!

A recent contract to the tropics of PNG made me happy with my AMD core as the apples & Multiple Sclerosis people using intel on top of fan mounted stands warning that my machine would die from the excessive heat. I went bush for a couple of days, with the machine left on so a friend could use it in my absence - no problems. So why the need for a BIG box.

use the web and find that which meets your needs.

Go linux

Definitely desktop!

I mean, if someone really needs mobility, than he doesn't even have a choice, only laptop will do. But for anything else, and especially 16hr/day computing/playing/whatever, desktop rules. MNSHO.

[ ...typing this on 22", two 320GB SATA disks in mirror, 2GB RAM... ]
--
www.linuxinsight.com

mobility and performance

I tend to use a laptop for everything and upgrade them. For example this L2005CL has an upgraded hard drive 160g, upgraded ram (all the way), upgraded Turion MT-36 and upgraded DVD-DLx8 lightscribe burner.

At the end of these somewhat extended life cycles (4 years) I tend to go for AMD dual or quad core Laptop Chips, (Maybe AMD Video next time) SATA drives (I hope external SATA ports appear on laptops).

I can't upgrade the motherboard and LCD but I can dock them via the Expansion Port or USB.

And I buy the most common brand that has the batteries and parts. I am very selective about the motherboard and LCD/Video since they have to last the longest.

Now if we can only get HP to install a Linux on their laptops. Now I just take a live kubuntu disk make sure that works before sale then put openSuSE on.

Hasta Le Vista Baby!

mobility vs performance

It's hard to say.

At the moment I only have a laptop, easier for me with the fact I am moving around a lot at Uni and it allows me to have access to things when I need them.

But a desktop does have the advantage of upgrading when you want to and you can tinker with things a bit more (and generally better support for *nix)

But then my laptop has a lot of things integrated, usb/firewire/bluetooth/wireless/ethernet/card reader etc. Which does make me feel like I am buying a well rounded system as opposed to a box with parts in...

More in Tux Machines

Debian Leftovers: Installer, CI, Stretch, and Devuan Jessie

Fedora Leftovers: Memorial Weekend ISO, LGBTQA Awareness Day and More

Linux 4.12 RC3, Linux Foundation Project Updates

  • Linux 4.12-rc3
    Hey, things continue to look good, and rc3 isn't even very big. I'm hoping there's not another shoe about to drop, but so far this really feels like a nice calm release cycle, despite the size of the merge window. Knock wood. Anyway, rc3 has a little bit of everything. The biggest single change is actually just a documentation update (the intel pstate docs were converted to rst format), so the diffstat actually looks a bit odd with a wuarter just being documentation. There's also some tooling updates (perf and some bpf selftest). But if you ignore those two pieces, it looks pretty normal: two thirds of it being drivers (gpu, nvme, scsi, tty, block), with the remainder being about half networking and haf "misc" (core kernel, header files, XFS, arch updates). Go forth and test, Linus
  • Linux 4.12-rc3 Kernel Released
    Linus Torvalds has announced the third weekly test candidate for the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel debut. Linus commented of Linux 4.12-rc3 that it isn't a very big release over the prior RCs and so far it's a "nice calm release cycle." The biggest change this past week was actually documentation updates.
  • Linus Torvalds Announced the Third Release Candidate of the Linux 4.12 Kernel
    Even if it's Memorial weekend, Linus Torvalds is on the job announcing the release and immediate availability of the third RC (Release Candidate) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel series.
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth Graduates to Active Status
    We’re happy to share that Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has granted the Hyperledger Sawtooth maintainer’s request to advance the project’s status from Incubation to Active. Hyperledger Iroha also graduated today.
  • Stronger Together: How Cloud Foundry Supports Other Communities
    The open source Cloud Foundry application development platform was publicly announced over six years ago, and along the way, we have connected with other projects, adopting technologies from other open source communities as they matured. For example, before Docker was a company or even a project, the Cloud Foundry platform was using Linux containers to isolate deployed applications from one another. Our container implementation wasn’t built in a general purpose way like Docker’s; it wasn’t designed to solve all of the potential use cases for a container runtime. It was designed specifically to support the stateless web applications that Cloud Foundry was initially intended to support, and to do that in a secure, multitenant fashion.

Reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment, cool KDE tweaks, and GNOME integration for Qt based application

  • 11 reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment for Linux
    Late last year, an upgrade to Fedora 25 caused issues with the new version of KDE Plasma that made it difficult for me to get any work done. So I decided to try other Linux desktop environments for two reasons. First, I needed to get my work done. Second, having been using KDE exclusively for many years, I thought it might be time to try some different desktops.
  • Which Linux desktop environment do you prefer?
  • 7 cool KDE tweaks that will change your life
  • Gnome integration for Qt based applications in Flatpak
    Following blog post from Patrick Griffis about new themes support in Flatpak, we started working on supporting this new feature too. Currently wherever you start a Qt application, it would always look like a KDE application or something would be missing, like icons so you would end up with bad experience and mixed feelings. This is going to change now as we now support Gnome in form of icons, widget style and Qt platform theme and with this, when you run a Qt application in Gnome, it will look definitely better and more natively than before. We packaged regular adwaita icons which are used by default in Gnome as extension of freedesktop runtime. For widget style we use adwaita-qt style, which is a Qt style attempting to look like Gtk’s adwaita and the most important part putting this all together is QGnomePlatform, a Qt platform theme which reads your Gnome configuration and applies it to running Qt applications. QGnomePlatform also enforces Qt apps to use adwaita icons and adwaita-qt style by default so that’s another reason why it is important. Both adwaita-qt and QGnomePlatform projects are by the way authored by Martin Bříza, a collegue of mine from Red Hat so if you meet him in person somewhere buy him a beer for that he cares about Qt integration in Gnome :). Now coming to a question how to install this and make it work. Basically all you need to do is install following extensions and you shold be done: