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News feeds blocks

Slashdot
42% (44 votes)
FreshMeat
6% (6 votes)
Linux Games
5% (5 votes)
LWN
2% (2 votes)
lxer.com
7% (7 votes)
NewsForge/Linux.com
1% (1 vote)
Linux Today
9% (10 votes)
Digg Linux/Unix
11% (12 votes)
Other (please comment)
18% (19 votes)
Total votes: 106

Other (Please Comment)

TUXMACHINES \o/

well, i'm subscribed to all of the above, but tuxmachines' feed is the only one i actually read, probably because srlinuxx posts top stories from all of the previouse sites Smile

RSS reader

I subscribed a lot: Distrowatch, tuxmachines, Desktoplinux, Mozilla Links-
I subscribed italian blog too: PuntoInformatico, TuxFeed, IlDisinformatico, pollycoke

------------------------------------------------
I'm looking for SimpliX!
Meet me on http://simplix.wordpress.com (italian)

Why FSDaily of course!

The digg-style site for free software news. You decide what's important, you submit it, you vote for it, you comment on it. Free software news for the free software community by the free software community.

Soon all of the formulas for promotion and burying will be open too so the community can help to find the least biased way to choose the news.

re: FSDaily

I'm actually just trying to see what folks might prefer to see on my side block over there. I gave up on OSNews cuz their rss feed sometimes doesn't update for hours. I like slashdot cuz it covers all sorts of subjects and I click on their headlines quite often. I'm not sure I like Digg, but if a lot of others do...

The trouble with FSDaily is that many times by the time stories end up on there, I've already found them and posted them to my site. I pull it in for myself, but I rarely see anything new there.

So, early results look like folks like Slashdot and Digg.

Give us a chance...

We don't have dedicated people going through news feeds finding news and deciding what to submit. It's a community driven site. The news is slow hitting our homepage at the moment only because we don't have enough active users yet.

However, we have gained over 1000 users in 3 months. Once there are more (active) users. People will (hopefully) be clawing to submit their free-software-related news to our site. Once that happens the news and articles which are important to the community will be there in abundance.

Then it will be the perfect feed for a side block on a free software related site.

I do understand your (and your audience's) leaning toward slashdot or digg though. They expand on the news you publish rather than potentially replicating it.

I, myself, can no longer stand digg. The MS fanboys just make it intolerable. As a foss advocate I find it really hard to see so many mis-informed opinions flying around.

*Edit: and I have noticed that of all the foss related news hubs you are the fastest at picking up the news. Lxer, LWN, digg, fossnews, osnews, etc., seem to be days behind most of the time. From my investigations it seems to be Tuxmachines followed by fsdaily for promptness. This is because: 1) we need more participation, 2) our news stays in the upcoming queue for a while before it hits the home page, 3) possibly because you get up earlier in the morning than some of our contributors, Smile and/or 4)...you never sleep ;P

The ultimate linux news feed

http://www.linuxinsight.com/aggregator aggregates practically all of the above and few more (17 linux news feeds in total).

You can also read 'em in your favorite RSS reader using this RSS feed address: http://feeds.linuxinsight.com/linuxportalnews

I hope you find it useful (all sites are carefully handpicked).

News feeds blocks

Other than tuxmachines, I subscribe to Desktop Linux and Distrowatch feeds.

More in Tux Machines

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Android Leftovers