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OLPC battery life--an update

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OLPC

After my Monday-morning blog post reporting on some preliminary battery-life testing for the XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child project, I was contacted by Jim Gettys, vice president software for OLPC.

This early testing showed that the current Beta 4 development systems achieve only a little over 5 hours of operation from a single charge of the lithium iron phosphate battery. According to Gettys, these batteries deliver about 20 WH (watt-hours) of energy.

Gettys told me that the XO's power consumption in those tests was about 3.81 watts, and provided me with a list of pending software changes and alternative usage models that will improve this figure:

More Here




Also:

Quanta Computer Inc., one of the world's leading suppliers of notebook PCs, has taken a move to hit the North American market with its low-priced laptops, according to industry sources.

The low-priced laptop, namely XO, is jointly developed between Quanta and U.S.'s Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the one laptop per child (OLPC) project, and Quanta is scheduled to deliver the low-priced models to Third World countries starting this October.

With low-prices notebook PCs becoming popular in the consumer market nowadays, ASUSTeK Computer Inc. and Intel have collectively developed an Eee PC, which will be on sale soon, to seize business opportunity during the back-to-school season, while Acer Inc. also shows an interest in venturing into the market.

Quanta to hit North American market with low-priced laptops

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