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Linux: Hasta la Vista, Microsoft!

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Linux

Unless you use an Apple Mac – or you're a particularly dedicated geek – your computer almost certainly runs a version of Microsoft Windows. There's little choice in the matter; almost all consumer PCs come with Windows already installed. Can you be bothered to change that?

But now, this stranglehold has been broken. Dell, one of the global giants that supplies businesses and homes with PCs, is selling some of its PCs with Linux, a rival operating system, already installed.

Linux makes your computer run quicker, it doesn't crash, it doesn't catch anywhere near as many viruses, and it's free. For a decade, it was available only for people to install themselves. But now, the geek's favourite is coming to the masses.

Dell's two Linux machines are the 530n desktop and 6400n laptop. Their prices are low – £399 and £329 respectively. That's partly because the version of Linux they run is free. Also, Linux doesn't work your PC as hard as Windows does, so you can get the same performance with cheaper, or older, hardware.

Many in the know prefer Linux. So is this the time to make a switch to Linux with your next PC purchase? Should you take Windows off your creaking old machine and give it a new lease of life, courtesy of Linux? Our table of comparisons will help you decide.

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