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About Me

I saw somewhere that it was advisable to include an "About Me" page for sites and blogs in case someone wants to quote you or address you formally and it adds credibility.

So for those that don't yet know, I'm Susan Linton. I live in the great state of Tennessee in the southern US of A. I have a Bachelor of Science degree from Austin Peay State U, and a few credits towards my Masters. I've worked as a middle school teacher, substitute teacher, auto mechanic, factory technician, cashier, auto body sander, auto parts department manager, call center agent and waitress (when I was 13 years old) over the course of my life. I currently run and write for this website and write for other sites and publications.

I've been using computers since 1992 when I purchased my first machine with DOS on it. I later bought a machine with Windows 98 and in the fall of 2000 I switched permanently to Linux. First Mandrake, then Gentoo fulltime, but I've tested about every one out there at some point. I don't claim to be an expert, but I love Linux and open source software. I enjoy installing distros and sharing with others what I see.

I can be contacted at this email address.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Olimex Tukhla High-End Open Source Hardware NXP i.MX 8QuadMax SBC in the Works

Most open-source hardware Arm Linux SBCs are optimized for cost, and there are few higher-end boards with extensive connectivity designed for professionals. Beagleboard X15 would be one of the rare examples currently available on the market, but it was launched five years ago. One European company noticed the void in this market and asked Olimex to develop a high-end open-source Linux board with a well-documented processor. They ruled out RK3399, and instead went Olimex Tukhla SBC will be powered by NXP i.MX 8QuadMax, the top processor of i.MX 8 family with two Cortex-A72 cores, four Cortex-A53 cores, and two real-time Cortex-M4F cores. Read more

Robotics Recap: Learning, Programming & Snapping ROS 2

Robotics@Canonical puts a strong focus on the migration from ROS to ROS 2. ROS 2 benefits from many improvements, especially robot security. Our goal is to make it easy for you to transition to ROS 2, whether you’re completely new to ROS or a seasoned engineer retooling for a new environment. Your new platform should be secure-by-default, and we expect you’ll need to pivot between different environments as you migrate from ROS to ROS 2. Along the way we’ve encountered some friction points, some mild surprises, and some opportunities to better leverage existing tools. Whenever that happened we tried to fix them and share our experiences so you didn’t run into the same problems! This has resulted in blog posts and videos in three key focus areas: getting started with ROS 2, software development in ROS 2, and building snaps for ROS. Let’s recap some of our recent output. Read more

Linux 5.8-rc5

Ok, so rc4 was small, and now a week later, rc5 is large.

It's not _enormous_, but of all the 5.x kernels so far, this is the
rc5 with the most commits. So it's certainly not optimal. It was
actually very quiet the beginning of the week, but things picked up on
Friday. Like they do..

That said, a lot of it is because of the networking fixes that weren't
in rc4, and I'm still not hearing any real panicky sounds from people,
and things on the whole seem to be progressing just fine.

So a large rc5 to go with a large release doesn't sound all that
worrisome, when we had an unusually small rc4 that precedes it and
explains it.

Maybe I'm in denial, but I still think we might hit the usual release
schedule. A few more weeks to go before I need to make that decision,
so it won't be keeping me up at night.

The diffstat for rc5 doesn't look particularly worrisome either. Yes,
there's a (relatively) high number of commits, but they tend to be
small. Nothing makes me go "umm".

In addition to the outright fixes, there's a few cleanups that are
just prep for 5.9. They all look good and simple too.

Anyway, networking (counting both core and drivers) amounts to about a
third of the patch, with the rest being spread all over: arch updates
(arm64, s390, arc), drivers (gpu, sound, md, pin control, gpio),
tooling (perf and selftests). And misc noise all over.

The appended shortlog gives the details, nothing really looks all that
exciting. Which is just as it should be at this time.

Go forth and test.

Thanks,

                 Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.8-rc5 Released As A Big Kernel For This Late In The Cycle