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Open source companies to watch

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OSS

Open source is making its way into more and more enterprises with cheap, robust alternatives to solutions offered by proprietary software vendors. Read this article to learn about eight open source companies worth watching in the areas of Web search, server virtualization, data integration, collaboration software and e-mail.

Company name: Apatar
Founded: February 2007
Location: Chicopee, Mass.

What does the company offer?

Tools that let customers integrate information from in-house applications or data sources with those hosted on the Web.

Why is it worth watching?

Apatar makes it easier to form partnerships by more effectively sharing data across applications, says Nucleus Research Vice President Rebecca Wetteman. “With the proliferation of on-demand applications, there is a lot of valuable data — and potential partnerships — out there on the Web,” she says. “But it’s hard to form partnerships, because data integration between the enterprise and Web-based applications is difficult. Apatar bridges this gap by [eliminating duplicate data], filtering, naming and storing Web-based data.”

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Also:

One year ago, Network World highlighted 10 open source companies on the rise in such diverse fields as storage, VoIP, systems management, virtualization and the use of software to aid disaster relief.

What’s become of last year’s open source companies to watch?

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