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AMD Hits Server Milestone

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Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices says it has cracked the 10 percent mark in x86 server processor shipments.

The Sunnyvale, Calif., chip maker, citing fresh figures from Mercury Research Inc. in Cave Creek, Ariz., said it garnered just over 11 percent of x86 server shipments in the second quarter, versus about 7 percent in the first quarter.

This is the first time Advanced Micro Devices Inc., whose dual-core Opteron processor arrived in April, has passed the 10 percent mark in server processor shipments, according to the Mercury Research survey.

Intel Corp. held the balance of the x86 server shipments.

AMD pointed to broader adoption of its Opteron chip in the second quarter, thanks in part to the chip's move to dual core, meaning that each chip includes two processor cores rather than one.

An AMD spokesperson said in an e-mail that the new figures show "proof positive that demand in the marketplace is growing for AMD Opteron."

"Clearly, AMD's customers took substantially more processors in the second quarter, resulting in higher unit shipments and greater market share of the server segment," Dean McCarron, principal analyst at Mercury Research, said in an e-mail to Ziff Davis Internet News.

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