Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

You Can Use the Desktop on a Laptop Now

Filed under
Linux

Recently, I bought a laptop. I consulted several friends to get a consensus as to which one would work best with Linux. Tallying the results, I decided to go with an IBM ThinkPad. I chose a barely used model T21 with a Pentium III 800, a 20GB hard drive, 256MB of RAM and a DVD-ROM. Prices ranged all over the place, but I found a one for less than $300.

Once the laptop arrived, I began searching around on Google to see which Linux distributions people used on ThinkPads. I even found a ThinkPad mailing list and some distribution-oriented laptop ones. Then, I found a tutorial that convinced me to go with Fedora Core 3.

Although the Fedora tutorial gave me many of hints on how to configure tools to take advantage of the ThinkPad's built-in functionality, Fedora did not work for me. I decided to stay with 256MB of RAM, primarily so I could help Linux users who could not afford to add the memory needed to get to 512MB. Perhaps if I upgraded to a higher level of memory, I could use Fedora. At 256MB of RAM, however, Fedora creeped. I felt like I was using a memory-starved Microsoft Windows machine.

Call it a challenge, but many postings exist on the mailing lists I follow from international users who simply can't afford to upgrade their memory. To an American, it doesn't seem so unrealistic simply to upgrade. To friends in Hungary, the costs seem high.

I spent the better part of two days trying a variety of distributions. Before people start writing comments about how much better their distributions run than the one I chose, let me say I played no favorites. I wanted performance and I got it with Ubuntu. Contrary to what some of you might believe, it's not my favorite Linux distro. It simply performed the best in this case.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

4 keys to success for LibreOffice as a service

The announcement of LibreOffice Online this week came as welcome news to many people concerned about the paucity of online options for those who want software freedom with their online document solutions. But can open source SaaS succeed? The open source community needs a truly open alternative to current mainstream online document collaboration solutions, all of which are compromised by lock-in. LibreOffice Online will offer the full flexibility to deploy in-house or hosted cloud instances while using true open standards for its documents. Read more

Bazel: Google Build Tool is now Open Source

Bazel, the tool that Google uses to build the majority of its software has been partially open sourced. According to Google, Bazel is aimed to build “code quickly and reliably” and is “critical to Google’s ability to continue to scale its software development practices as the company grows.” Read more Also: Q&A: Databases, Open Source & Virtualisation with CEO Vinay Joosery

Ubuntu Kylin 15.04 Beta 2 Is Now Available for Download - Screenshot Tour

After announcing the Ubuntu 15.04 Final Beta and Kubuntu 15.04 Beta 2, it is now time to take a look at the second and last Beta release of the upcoming Ubuntu Kylin 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) operating system that has been designed especially for the Chinese Ubuntu Linux community. Read more Also: Ubuntu MATE 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Beta 2 Switches to Systemd - Screenshot Tour Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Final Beta Officially Released - Screenshot Tour

Kubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Released with KDE Plasma 5 as Default Desktop - Screenshot Tour

Today’s announcement for Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Final Beta also mentioned the immediate availability for download and testing of Kubuntu 15.04 Beta 2, an official Ubuntu flavor built around the modern and attractive KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications project. Read more Also: Xubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Released, Offers a Neat Xfce 4.12 Experience - Screenshot Tour