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Book Review: Ubuntu for Non-Geeks

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For those who tire of a Microsoft hegemony on their laptops and desktop PCs, there is another choice: Linux. This open source and essentially free version of Unix has the reputation of being for the über-techie, but if you want to give it a shot, there's a version called Ubuntu (a South African terms that means "humanity towards others") that may be up your alley. The book Ubuntu for Non-Geeks (2nd. edition) claims to be "a hands-on, project-based, take-it-slow guidebook for those interested in - but nervous about - switching to the Linux operating system."

I'd largely agree with this, and at $34.95, which includes a CD with the operating system (you can even try it before fully installing it on your hard drive), it's a cheap experiment. However, depending on what you want to do, it may be a bit trickier, technically, than the book implies.

Trying the operating system was as easy as putting the CD into my drive and rebooting.

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Ubuntu for Non-Geeks

I was contacted by No Starch Press and I was offered a free book on Ubuntu for review and I must admit that this is a book I am more than glad to review.

I will try to be as balanced as possible in this review, but of course my judgement is influenced by my experience as an Ubuntu user, as a moderator on ubuntuforums.org and as a (geek) troubleshooter (and developer).

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