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Linux for Parents - A Beginners Guide to Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I upgraded my mum from Windows XP to Ubuntu. This page will serve as a central location for all of the beginner-to-intermediate Ubuntu “how-to” tutorials that I create.

Topics include:

Browser Related

How to change your Home Page in Firefox
How to delete one (or more) sites from your Firefox address bar (the drop-down list of previously viewed sites)
How to add and edit the sites in the Firefox Bookmarks Toolbar

Managing Files, Folders and Programs

How to rename a file or folder in Ubuntu
How to create a desktop shortcut in Ubuntu
How to install programs in Ubuntu using the Synaptic Package Manager
How to install, setup and use Google Desktop Search in Ubuntu
How to share files and folders across your network in Ubuntu
How to install Windows programs and applications in Ubuntu - using Wine

Ubuntu “Look and Feel” (User Interface)

How to change your desktop background/wallpaper
How to change the Ubuntu screensaver
How to change the Ubuntu theme
Email Related

How to set up and use Evolution - the default email program in Ubuntu

More Here




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