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Customizing your screensaver in GNOME

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HowTos

One popular screensaver in Ubuntu is “Floating Ubuntu”, which displays a number of Ubuntu logos floating around the screen. This screensaver exists in many different flavours; for example in Ubuntu you can also find “Floating Feet”, that has the GNOME logo instead of Ubuntu’s; or, on Debian you have Debian’s “swirls” floating around. I thought that it would probably be easy to customize it and have an image of my choice floating around instead. Unfortunately, screensavers in Ubuntu are not configurable using the GUI so I had to hack the screensaver myself. Here’s how I did it.

Anyway, I decided that I wanted a Floating Tyrrell screensaver, with the team’s logo floating around on the screen. Doing some research on Google, I found that what I needed was a file in the /usr/share/applications/screensavers directory, and that Floating Ubuntu’s configuration file was ubuntu_theme.desktop. Now if you look into the file you’d easily guess what you need to do to customize the screensaver with an image of your choice:

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