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Dancing with Wolves, a Wolvix Hunter 1.1.0 Review

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Reviews

When Kenneth (aka Wolven) submitted Wolvix Hunter and Cub 1.1.0 to us here at On-Disk.com it was nice to see he had a new release, but I had not expected more than some updates to the existing model. Then, as I did the normal double checking that is done when we prepare to post a new release, I found that this was a serious jump from previous releases based on Slax. The new version is based on Slackware itself and the Linux-Live Scripts. I also noticed a great software management tool called "Gslapt", which makes adding, removing, and updating software extremely easy. This peeked my curiosity so I decided I needed to take a closer look.

Live
Wolvix is a Live distribution, meaning that you put the disc into the computer and turn it on and it will run from just a CD as if it were installed on your computer. It's from this LiveCD that you can install Wolvix or just use it from the CD. Live CD or DVDs run a little slower because optical drives are slower than hard drives. Although this holds true for Wolvix as well, you might find that when Wolvix is running from the LiveCD it's at least as fast, or even faster, than your currently installed operating system.

More Here




A worthwhile distro let down by an idiotic reviewer

> Now that it was installed I had a few choices. I opted to just change the root password
> and always login as root. Many feel it is breach in security, or safety, but I'm used to
> being in the root environment and prefer it. Yes, a few programs refuse to run under the
> root user, but if I can't run them as root without risking harm to my system I prefer not
> to use them at all.

Ah, a "Power User"...

Wolven's quite clear that 1.1.0 will be the last version of Wolvix not to require the person performing the install to establish an ordinary user account, and he strongly advises users to set one up immediately after installation.

hang on a moment...

> By Todd Robinson, Systems Devlopment Engineer
> for Webpath Technologies and On-Disk.com

So the development engineer of the company responsible for pressing *literally thousands* of CD-ROMs and DVD-ROMs "always logs in as Root"...

I suppose when news of this gets out and Robinson eventually gets the sack, there'll always be a job waiting for him at Pardus!

re: On-Disk.com

Lets see...

On-Disk.com
Fedora 7 DVD $12.35
Fedora 7 Live $11.35
Shipping $1.89 (calculated by package weight)
Plus all the so-so reviews you can stomach,

Or

Discountlinuxdvd.com
Fedora 7 DVD $1.99
Fedora 7 KDE Live CD $0.99
Shipping $1.99 (no matter how many disks you order)
Unfortunately, they just offer most Linux/BSD DVD and CD's (both 32bit and 64bit version) with professional printed disks and fast service - but no reviews (lame or otherwise).

Funding for Projects

One thing you should know about On-Disk.com is that we operate a little differently than other ISO-to-Media Vendors.

You see we have a saying - "If the project doesn't want the money, then neither do we."

Items end up in our catalog in one of two ways.

1) the Developer puts it there via http://portal.on-disk.com

- or -

2) It's requested as a custom disc often enough that it's no longer a custom disc.

And you're right, we're not rock bottom, but the price you're seeing is usually set by the projects themselves and the extra money they earn at On-disk.com is used to pay for the development of software you get for free or that the other vendors profit from.

The total we've given to the developers is just under $16k (in the two years we've been operating this way)

As far as Fedora the $16k doesn't include Sponsored Media. The price you pay for a Fedora disc at On-disk.com includes a disc for you AND covers the cost of the disc and postage for someone on the Fedora Free Media Waiting list. Fedora does not have funding from Red Hat for this project and the majority of the Free Media discs sent are burned by one of the Fedora Ambassadors and mailed at their own expense. Even with the sponsorships, Free Media has a hard time filling all of the requests. There can be over 100 requests in a single hour, but it takes us more than a month to fill 100.

If you'd like to see the impact On-disk has had for the Fedora Free Media Project, you will find the tracking for F7, FC6 and FC5 at http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Distribution/FreeMedia Anyplace you see "KarlieRobinson" it's where a sponsorship has taken place.

As far as "all the so-so reviews" this is only our third. It takes something really special for me to pull resources away from day to day business so that we can dig around in a distro.

Karlie Robinson
Owner, Webpath Technologies

Re: Funding for Projects

> As far as "all the so-so reviews" this is only our third.
> It takes something really special for me to pull resources
> away from day to day business so that we can dig around in a distro.

Rudimentary Linux security training for your "Systems Development Engineer"?

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