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rPath™ Reaches One Million Appliance Downloads

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Led by sites like VMware Virtual Appliance Marketplace,
more than 50% of downloads are virtual appliances

Raleigh, NC (July 31, 2007) – rPath™, provider of the first platform for creating and maintaining software and virtual appliances, today announced its one millionth software appliance download. Sources of the one million downloads of rPath-based appliances include rBuilder Online, as well as partner sites such as VMware’s Virtual Appliance Marketplace (VAM). Reflecting the explosive growth in virtualization use, over 50% of the downloads were in virtual appliance format.

Software appliances represent an opportunity for ISVs to streamline and simplify software distribution and management. With an appliance, software vendors can ship thoroughly tested, standard configurations that require minimal installation effort, making them more accessible to potential buyers. Simple software is easier to sell, enabling the ISV to enter markets and open channels of distribution that were previously unavailable to them.

“Our momentum over the past year reflects both the value of the software appliance model and the technical superiority of the rPath solution,” stated Billy Marshall, CEO of rPath. “rPath provides a platform and process that enables application companies to expand into new markets, open new channels of distribution and reduce their development costs.”

About rPath
rBuilder and rPath Appliance Platform transform applications into software appliances. Software appliances simplify server applications by eliminating the hassles of installation, configuration, and maintenance. Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) can expand their markets and simultaneously reduce development and support costs by adopting the software appliance approach. rPath is also the first and only company to automate support for all the major virtualization formats. The company is headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina. For more information, visit http://www.rpath.com.

Media Relation Contact:
Jill Dykes
Crossroads Public Relations
919.749.8488
jdykes@crossroadspr.com

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