Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Matrix-style 'bullet-time' in multiplayer gaming

Filed under
Gaming

In a strange example of the cyber-world imitating Hollywood imitating the cyber-world, Finnish researchers have developed a way to achieve the "bullet-time" effect of the movie The Matrix in real-time multiplayer games.

The effect combines slow motion with dynamic virtual-camera movement to seemingly allow a character to slow down their environment, giving them more time to respond to game events.

The challenge had been to achieve this with real-time online multiplayer games, says Jouni Smed at the University of Turku. So far the closest anyone has come to it is by speeding up the player, instead of slowing down the environment, he says. "It's not the effect one wants because the player has even less time to react."

Smed's solution is to exploit something called a local perception filter (LPF). This is software that compensates for the natural communication-time delays which occur in networked games by rendering objects and players at slightly out-of-date locations.

Strategic advantage

In locally networked games, time delays can be as much as 10 milliseconds, while transatlantic games suffer a latency of around 60 milliseconds. However, the use of LPFs means players do not notice any time lag because events are ever so slightly slowed down until the game catches up with itself.

Using a test-bench game called MaxMaze Demonstrator, Smed and colleagues found that they could also artificially introduce delays of up to a few seconds, allowing one player to slow down their environment and gain a strategic advantage, while game-time appeared normal to their opponent.

Without LPFs or similar techniques, networked games would appear more jerky, with characters jumping from one position to another as the system hangs waiting for updates, says Smed. But the downside of these conventional techniques is that sometimes characters are not where they appear to be to other players. This is why players may occasionally think they have shot an opponent in a game and are surprised when their target refuses to die, he notes.

By Duncan Graham-Rowe
NewScientist.com

More in Tux Machines

Atomic Mode-Setting/Display Support Progresses In Linux 3.20

Going along with many DRM graphics driver improvements for Linux 3.20 is the seemingly never-ending work on atomic mode-setting. Atomic mode-setting/display support has been talked about for years but is finally nearing a reality within the mainline Linux kernel with drivers like the Tegra DRM driver adding initial support. With Linux 3.20 there's the actual Linux DRM Atomic IOCTL and along with other changes means that Linux user-space can start accessing the atomic support, albeit it's hidden for now behind the experimental drm-atomic=1 flag. Read more

Industrial box-PC takes Linux-on-Haswell to extremes

The Acnodes “FES8670″ is a rugged industrial box-PC that runs Linux on a 4th Gen Core CPU, and offers four GbE ports and numerous storage and display ports. So far, we’ve still only seen one company (Congatec) announce products based on Intel’s new 5th Generation Core (“Broadwell”) processors, although we expect many more to break cover at Embedded World next month. Yet, there’s still plenty of juice left in the 4th Gen Haswell Core chips, which drive Acnodes’s powerhouse FES8670. Earlier Acnodes industrial PCs have included the Atom D2550-based FES2215. Read more

Deploying tor relays

On November 11, 2014 Mozilla announced the Polaris Privacy Initiative. One key part of the initiative is us supporting the tor network by deploying tor middle relay nodes. On January 15, 2015 our first proof of concept (POC) went live. Read more Also: Get Smart On International Data Privacy Day

Android Leftovers

  • 15 reasons Android can be better than the iPhone
    Smartphone preference is always a hot topic among enthusiasts, with the iPhone vs. Android rivalry being the most obvious one since the smartphone revolution started by the original iPhone eight years ago. While Google’s Android is the most popular smartphone OS by market share, Apple is still a significant adversary, one that has never been beaten when it comes to smartphone profits. In fact, Apple on Tuesday announced record and estimates-smashing revenue, and most importantly, iPhone sales.
  • Top 5 Best Android Games of January 2015
    A nice array of great mobile games hit the Android Google Play store at the start of the new year. Along with these new games to pass the time with, several other released games have maintained their stronghold over the top games chart. We’re here to make sure you download some of the finer outings available to mobile games who game primarily on Android devices. These are simply the top five best Android games of January 2015. There’s action, puzzle, strategy and racing games that you’ll need to play. Here’s just a few of the best,
  • android-galaxyzoo: Superficial porting to Android 5.0 (Material design)
    Here are some notes about my experience adapting android-galaxyzoo to Material design for Android 5.0 (Lollipop) though I only used the most superficial parts of Material design.
  • This Super Cheap Android Phone Looks Exactly Like The iPhone 6
    Dozens of Chinese technology companies have created iPhone 6 look-alikes that run Android and cost a lot less than Apple's smartphone. Most of these knockoffs, however, look and feel a bit cheaper and come with low-end hardware compared to the iPhone.