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Grandmom’s guide to Linux/Ubuntu: Watching b**tleg movies

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Ubuntu

When I retired to the Philippines, I couldn’t bring my collection of nice g rated films (ok a few R rated ones too) because I never had bought a DVD player, but relied on my lowly VCR. I had a nice collection of films from TBS and TNT and AMC, and a few from the networks. Sure, they included commercials, but hey the price (free) hit my budget.
And it wasn’t until I knew that I was retiring that I did manage to buy a few cheap DVD’s at Walmart.

Now, here in the Philippines, we can find brand new movies being sold at the open air market for 80 cents a few days after they open in Hong Kong, or if we want to be legal, we will buy them at the mall a few weeks after the films open for about 3 dollars US a piece. Actually we prefer the latter, because the ones at the Palanke are often poor quality, pirated films from China, and of course illegal.

So now I have a collection: My US DVD’s, my VCD that need an Asian codec to run, and your computer will only let you play one country. I also have a few downloaded films from Google or other libraries. Did you know you can download movies from libraries? True, they are old classics, but I like them.

And if you are under 18 you probably know about Limewire and Bittorrent.

The problem is watching them.

My grandson told me the way to get around this:

More Here.

Follow-up.




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