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Pyro delivers Web apps to the Linux desktop

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Software

The Pyro project has launched its "Pyro Desktop," a new Linux application with the lofty goal of "true integration between the Web and modern desktop computing." Pyro offers an interesting new approach to deploying Web-based applications on the Linux desktop, reminiscent of Opera's and Vista's widgets.

The project is led by Alex Gravely, working in conjunction with Chris Toshok, a Mono developer. In announcing the alpha release of Pyro this week, Gravely stated, "Web content is no longer confined to the browser's window. Instead, trusted web sites and extensions are given access to the full range of interactivity and control enjoyed by native applications today."

Pyro's announcement teases readers to imagine...

More Here.




Keep the Web in the browser, please.

pinderkent.blogsavy.com: This sort of desktop integration makes me feel uneasy. The first problem I see with it is that it’s unnecessary. Current web browsers work just fine as they are, for the most part. Some of them could be slimmed down somewhat, but ones like Opera and Konqueror function quite well. Konqueror, for instance, integrates well into the entire KDE desktop environment without being obtrusive.

The second problem I see is that it promotes bad habits. In fact, this second problem may be the most significant problems.

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