Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Editing basics for the xorg.conf file

Filed under
HowTos

For many users, the xorg.conf file, which configures the system resources, graphics card, keyboard, pointing device, and monitor for a computer running the X Window System, is an exception to GNU/Linux's do-it-yourself credo. Users who think nothing of editing /etc/fstab or /etc/hosts.allow will shy away from xorg.conf for fear of breaking their systems, relying instead on tools such as the KDE Control Center or Debian's dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg instead. But learning your way around xorg.conf not only teaches you a lot about how your system operates -- it can also come in handy when the graphical display fails and you either can't remember the handy command that does the work for you, or you're working with a distribution that isn't blessed with it.

It's easy to understand users' caution. Not only does xorg.conf contain a lot that can go wrong, but it is only fitfully documented in man and Web pages. Moreover, because the file's settings are specific to each system, borrowing an example of the file off the Internet is unlikely to give you more than basic ideas of how to get its settings correct. However, so long as you remember to make a backup copy of the file and keep within the settings defined by the documentation that comes with the hardware, the danger is actually minimal.

The xorg.conf file is divided into a minimum of eight sections.

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

This Custom Android-x86 Build Puts Android 7.1.1 on Your PC, with Linux 4.11 RC7

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton was happy to announce the release of a new build of his custom built Android-x86 project that lets uses runs the latest Android mobile operating system on their personal computers. Read more

Clear Linux Announces Intel Clear Containers 2.1.6 with Docker 17.04.0 Support

Clear Linux's Kent Helm was proud to announce the release and general availability of Intel Clear Containers 2.1.6, a maintenace update that promises to improve compatibility with recent Docker releases, but also adds various bug fixes. Read more

Nantes Métropole releases open source tool for LibreOffice transition

The French city of Nantes (Nantes Métropole) has released an open source tool used to schedule its migration to LibreOffice. The shift from commercial software to the free and open source LibreOffice productivity suite started in 2013 and is intended to save the administration EUR 260 000 per year. The transition was finalised in April 2016. Read more

Today in Techrights