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ECS KN1 Extreme (1.0f) nForce4 Ultra ATX

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ECS was traditionally known for their value/budget motherboards, but NOT TODAY! They are trying to do away with that reputation with their Extreme line of motherboards. Why? Because it is the Awesome thing to do. ECS is also one of the few companies out there with the facilities and capital to carry out their promises to deliver some very high quality and high end product coming up in the next while. The KN1 Extreme we look at today is just a taste of what they have in store.

The ECS KN1 Extreme is a socket 939 motherboard sporting the nForce 4 Ultra (single) chipset. What that means is you get support for PCI Express, SATA (3Gb/s), MediaShield Storage, RAID, ActiveArmour, and Gigabit LAN.

Pros

  • clean board layout and legible labels

  • colour coding (Distinguished Slots of Clarity)
  • up to 12 USB ports
  • 2 Firewire headers
  • 6 SATA headers (4 of which are SATA2), 3 IDE headers (all up to UDMA133)
  • extra cooling (Orb of Greater Cooling and Chilling Neon Fan)
  • SPDIF connectors
  • Sempron to X2 support (Joe Regular Support of Awesome)
  • BIOS top-hat kit (BIOS Resurrection Kit Level 10)
  • lots of cables

Con

  • Nitpick: RAM settings do not show when set to auto

Misc

  • ECS has added memory settings in the BIOS which previous reviewers complained about

  • CPU multiplier settings are hidden in the Power Management
  • ingenious solution to only 3 minijacks for surround sound.


Overall: 9.5

Full Review.

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