Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GPS might help unclog rush hour highways

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A new pilot program taking place in the Seattle area could help pave the way to less clogged highways during rush hour.

The average rush hour commuter spends 47 hours a year in traffic -- up from just 16 hours in 1982.

The pilot program, using global positioning system devices, is supposed to cut that time in traffic.

For the next few months, the Seattle drivers will trek around with a GPS device attached to their dashboards that will determine the location of the vehicle, when they are driving and if the vehicle is on a road being tolled.

Drivers will be charged varying tolls depending on when they drive -- higher premiums during rush hour, and lower tolls for other times. The study will examine if people change behavior based on the tolls.

Commuters in the San Francisco-Oakland area spend 72 hours a year commuting, while those in Boulder, Colo., spend 9 hours.

UPI

More in Tux Machines

Turris MOX is a Modular & Open Source Router

A company from the Czech Republic is trying to raise money to bring a modular and open source router to the public. It has a number of features that can’t be found in the current line up of routers available for purchase. Read more

Openwashing: Intel, Apple, and Microsoft

  • The Several Faces of Intel Compilers [Ed: It says that this so-called 'article' is "sponsored", so IDG is now running ads as 'articles'. Not even pretense about whether it's journalism or not.]
  • FoundationDB Goes Open Source [Ed: "FoundationDB gave Apple a foothold in the crowded NoSQL database sector," it says and this is what this openwashing is all about. It's helping Apple in spreading its proprietary frameworks and surveillance 'clouds'.]
  • Linux Everywhere (Premium) [Ed: "Linux Everywhere," says longtime Microsoft propagandist, in service (IMHO) of the latest EEE strategy. Don't forget who's still in charge.]

Android Leftovers

An introduction to the GNU Core Utilities

These two collections of Linux utilities, the GNU Core Utilities and util-linux, together provide the basic utilities required to administer a Linux system. As I researched this article, I found several interesting utilities I never knew about. Many of these commands are seldom needed, but when you need them, they are indispensable. Between these two collections, there are over 200 Linux utilities. While Linux has many more commands, these are the ones needed to manage the basic functions of a typical Linux host. Read more