Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Internet provides instant Harry Potter reviews

Filed under
Web

In the age of the Internet, a book review can be virtually instant.

The latest instalment in the Harry Potter series, on sale from Saturday in one of the most eagerly anticipated book launches ever, is already under the microscope of speed-reading critics, and opinion is divided.

Within hours of "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" hitting the shelves, Harry has been likened to Luke Skywalker from the "Star Wars" films, Henry V and King Arthur, and evil afoot in the plot to recent bomb attacks in London.

Plot summaries are also appearing with what publishers may regard as unseemly haste, forcing readers to settle down and plow through the book's 607 pages of magic and mystery.

The British Broadcasting Corporation's Web site, www.bbc.co.uk, featured its own Harry Potter "review blog," with a staff member updating readers on his thoughts even before he reached the end of the hardback tome.

"I've just finished the last few words of the book," he wrote at 5.30 a.m. (0430 GMT), five hours and 30 minutes after the book's official launch.

"In many ways this book has been a mere staging ground for Rowling's final narrative to come," the review continues.

"Too much of the book was either a repeat of what we have seen before, or bogged down by Rowling's attempts to maneuver plot lines and characters into position.

"After a while all magic tricks begin to lose their impact."

Others were more complimentary, some positively gushing, as Rowling fulfilled expectations that she would tackle the dark side of life at Hogwarts School of Wizardry and Witchcraft.

"Call out the grief counsellers," wrote Sandra Martin on www.theglobeandmail.com.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft and Linux

GNOME News

  • gnome-boxes: Coder’s log
    So another two weeks have passed and it’s time to sum things up and reflect a little on the struggles and accomplishments that have marked this time period, which was quite a bumpy ride compared to the others, but definitely more exciting.
  • GNOME Keysign 0.6
    It’s been a while since I reported on GNOME Keysign. The last few releases have been exciting, because they introduced nice features which I have been waiting long for getting around to implement them.
  • Testing for Usability
    I recently came across a copy of Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works (book, 2005) by Goto and Cotler. The book includes a chapter on "Testing for Usability" which is brief but informative. The authors comment that many websites are redesigned because customers want to add new feature or want to drive more traffic to the website. But they rarely ask the important questions: "How easy is it to use our website?" "How easily can visitors get to the information they want and need?" and "How easily does the website 'lead' visitors to do what you want them to do?" (That last question is interesting for certain markets, for example.)

SUSE Leftovers

  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications
    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3. Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22
    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports! With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.

Red Hat Financial News