Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

M$ Vole sued over Hamster

Filed under
Legal

SOFTWARE GIANT Microsoft and its IP Ventures division have received a writ from Artemis Solutions Group alleging that the Vole has breached its trademark and engaged in unfair competition.

The complaint, filed in a Texas district court, said that Artemis owns a trademark called Biocert (2,817,357) and that it's used this mark continually for several years. The firm said it markets and distributes products using the Biocert mark including fingerprint authentication toolkits for developers (wwww.biocert.us), fingerprint USB memory keys (www.clipbio.com), and in Biocert Oddysey - a portable fingerprint biometric USB hard drive.

Artemis also said it makes the Biocert Hamster, Optimouse and Keyboard - also biometric devices (www.mybiocert.com/peripherals.htm).

But Artemis claims that in early May, Microsoft and its IP Venture firm started using the term Biocert without permission, "even though the most rudimentary trademark search would have revealed" Artemis was already using it.

Artemis also alleges that it's been using the term Biocert when it talked to hacks, to venture capitalists, and to others.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Kernel Space/Linux

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more