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Another reason I love open source software

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OSS

This weekend I was reminded of another reason that I love open source software: A transparent development process. Only in open source software will you be able to talk directly to the developers of a software project and give them your input. This is one of the reasons that open source projects tend to focus specifically on the requirements of the users. Let me tell you my story...

I recently discovered a young open source project called ZipTie. I first tried running ZipTie on Ubuntu, but I ran into some errors, which I posted on the forum. A developer quickly replied and asked me to test it again with a different setting. I made the change but the problem still existed. Then the developer suggested a work-around to get me going until they could find the root cause of the errors. His work-around did the trick, and it allowed me to successfully discover all of my network devices. Here is the bug-report I submitted, which will allow the developers to keep track of this issue and inform me when the problem is fixed.

More Here.




Also:

Twice in the past few months I’ve encountered the phrase “open source” outside the context of software. It seems the underlying ideas (which are pretty generic and powerful) and being latched onto by other areas of specialism like the intelligence services, architecture and politics. Try this on for size:

the phrase “open source” goes mainstream

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