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Just What is the "Linux Developers Community"?

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Linux

I must report that the woodshed session resulted in just a mere good old fashioned ‘talking-to”. As our readers know, we involve ourselves heavily in the linux developers community. We have offered and have given proven producers money for their efforts. Such fruits should be available for all to pick from in November of this year…and yes, resulting from the work of the Linux Developers Community. Now, I have been taken to task for using that term. Linux Developers community.

Yes, helios is aware that there is no monolithic structrure or sprawling complex with manned security that has huge granite signs stating: International Linux Development Headquarters. We also realize that there is no Brotherhood of Linux Union, organized Linux Fraternity or bowling league…at least not officially sanctioned by linux. See, that’s the point. Tell me of something that IS officially sanctioned by Linux.

So the question begs to be asked: Just who is a linux developer? Let’s look at the obvious choices we have. Ok Linus. Nothing like starting at the shallow end of the pool I say. Not many stumbles on this end. Now, some would argue that it gets mirky from here…and maybe it does. From there, we have legion of kernel developers and hackers, toiling away in obscurity. (I am informed that this is mutually benificial to hacker and society alike). As you butt-slide down the steep rocky slope that is Linux, you will begin to see more and more people involved in the development process. Some in clusters, some paired up…some working alone…but all working on one grand thing.

Linux.

and what are they doing?

Developing.

Developing what? Let’s take a look.

Full Article.

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