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New AntiX distro makes older hardware usable

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Linux
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I've been a fan of SimplyMEPIS for years. The distribution was one of the early pioneers in the field of user-friendly Linux development, and to this day offers a system that usually "just works." Earlier this month the MEPIS site announced a community variation for older computers based on SimplyMEPIS. AntiX is an installable live CD that features a modern kernel, recent X server, and lighter applications for use on computers with as little as 64MB RAM. I tried it, and liked what I found.

I tested AntiX on my everyday laptop (a Hewlett-Packard dv6105 with a 2.0GHz AMD Turion and 512MB RAM) as well as an older 667MHz Pentium III computer. I was immediately disappointed that a distribution advertised for "antique" computers doesn't ship with (or provide on mirrors) a diskette boot image. Many computers of that target era don't have the capability of booting from the CD-ROM drive. Overlooking that requirement is a major flaw in this distro design.

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Nice Review

That is a very nice review. Hope to see many more of these in the future... Smile

You can never say anything bad about Linux, can you?

re: nice review

schestowitz wrote:

That is a very nice review. Hope to see many more of these in the future... Smile

Thanks for saying. They have a wonderful editor. My articles always sound much better over there.

schestowitz wrote:

You can never say anything bad about Linux, can you?

Teehee. Sometimes I do. Wink

Positivity is Good

I'm always shaking when I see a Linux review from Jem Matzan (even Radu). Just watch his latest attack on GNU. Ouch!

Free software needs the support and positive feedback, which if what you always offer. I like that because it make it easier to cite . With luddites (trolls) around, weaknesses of Linux grow roots and become stereotypes.

re: 667 MHz computer without a cdrom bios choice

atang1 wrote:

Review is wonderful but over exaggerated about needing floppy boot disk? The last motherboard lacking cdrom boot choice in their bios must be 486 CPU class?

Actually, the article was edited a bit. I was originally complaining about the lack of floppy image cuz I had an older computer than the 667 era machine I really wanted to use. But since I couldn't figure out a way to boot the cdrom, I had to go with that 667 - well obviously. But it was still a valid point and so that part was left in.

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