Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Leaders Unfazed by Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Open source software leaders said Wednesday they were unfazed by suggestions that Microsoft is attempting to divide the community and threaten it with lawsuits.

Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin and Red Hat vice president Mike Evans said the Redmond software giant was barely discussed at an open source summit held at Google headquarters last week.

Microsoft has recently struck a series of cooperation and indemnification pacts with individual Linux distributors, raising suggestions it is trying to divide and conquer the community(see Microsoft Signs Third Linux Pact, Microsoft’s Symbiotic Linux Deals, Open Source Group Spares Novell).. Those fears were heightened when the software giant for the first time said the Linux operating system and other open source software infringes on 235 of its patents (see Microsoft Stokes Linux Fears). That left many wondering whether Microsoft would sue the customers of companies that didn’t play by the software giant’s rules.

More Here.




Also:

Last week, at the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit held at the Googleplex, some of Linux's top kernel developers discussed the state of the Linux kernel today, and where it might be going.

Among the kernel developers present were Andrew Morton, James Bottomley, Chris Wright, Ted T'so, and Greg Kroah-Hartman. About the only top Linux kernel developer who wasn't present was Linus Torvalds, the originator of the kernel.

In a panel discussion chaired by Jon Corbett, a Linux developer himself and editor of LWN.net, the group took on many contentious issues. After introductions, in which the quiet Morton unexpectedly added a note of levity by remarking that "If you don't know who I am you shouldn't be here," Corbett started the panel off by asking, "Is the quality of the current kernel (Linux 2.6.21) horrific?"

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

2014: A Banner Year for Open Source

Open source was initially adopted for low cost and lack of vendor lock-in, but customers have found that it also results in better innovation and more flexibility. Now it is pervasive, and it is challenging proprietary incumbents across technology categories. It is not only mainstream, open source is truly leading innovation in areas like cloud, mobile, big data, the Internet of Things, and beyond. As we embark on a new year, I cannot help but reflect on the speed with which technology is changing. Rapidly delivering technology is about much more than just the technology – it is about people and culture. More than ever, this is why executives are looking at key technology companies – including Red Hat – as their partner instead of as a vendor. Read more

IsoHunt releases roll-your-own Pirate Bay

Open Source Meritocracy Is More Than a Joke

In January 2014, Github removed the rug in its office's waiting room in response to criticism of its slogan, "United Meritocracy of Github." Since then, the criticism of the idea of meritocracy has spread in free software circles. "Meritocracy is a joke," has become a slogan seen on T-shirts and constantly proclaimed, especially by feminists. Such commentary is true — so far as it goes, but it ignores the potential benefits of meritocracy as an ethos. Anyone who bothers to look can see that meritocracy is more of an ideal than a standard practice in free software. The idea that people should be valued for their contributions may seem to be a way to promote fairness, but the practice is frequently more complicated. Read more Also: Unmanagement and unleadership

Linux Kernel Developers Consider Live Kernel Patching Solution

kPatch and kGraph may soon enable live kernel updates on all Linux distributions, making it possible to apply security and other patches on the open source operating system without rebooting. Read more