Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Leaders Unfazed by Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Open source software leaders said Wednesday they were unfazed by suggestions that Microsoft is attempting to divide the community and threaten it with lawsuits.

Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin and Red Hat vice president Mike Evans said the Redmond software giant was barely discussed at an open source summit held at Google headquarters last week.

Microsoft has recently struck a series of cooperation and indemnification pacts with individual Linux distributors, raising suggestions it is trying to divide and conquer the community(see Microsoft Signs Third Linux Pact, Microsoft’s Symbiotic Linux Deals, Open Source Group Spares Novell).. Those fears were heightened when the software giant for the first time said the Linux operating system and other open source software infringes on 235 of its patents (see Microsoft Stokes Linux Fears). That left many wondering whether Microsoft would sue the customers of companies that didn’t play by the software giant’s rules.

More Here.




Also:

Last week, at the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit held at the Googleplex, some of Linux's top kernel developers discussed the state of the Linux kernel today, and where it might be going.

Among the kernel developers present were Andrew Morton, James Bottomley, Chris Wright, Ted T'so, and Greg Kroah-Hartman. About the only top Linux kernel developer who wasn't present was Linus Torvalds, the originator of the kernel.

In a panel discussion chaired by Jon Corbett, a Linux developer himself and editor of LWN.net, the group took on many contentious issues. After introductions, in which the quiet Morton unexpectedly added a note of levity by remarking that "If you don't know who I am you shouldn't be here," Corbett started the panel off by asking, "Is the quality of the current kernel (Linux 2.6.21) horrific?"

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

How to: Install Google Chrome web browser on Ubuntu Linux (and uninstall Firefox)

Ubuntu comes with a lot of quality software pre-installed. Unfortunately, the default web browser, Mozilla Firefox, has been on the decline -- it is slow and clunky. On Linux, Google Chrome is now the top web browser, and it is the best way to experience Adobe Flash content too (if you still need it). Installing Google Chrome on the Linux-based operating system is not totally straightforward. This is unfortunate, as the search-giant's web browser is an important part of having an overall quality experience on Ubuntu. Don't worry, however, as we will help you to both install the wonderful Google Chrome and uninstall the disappointing Mozilla Firefox. Read more

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" Gets the Latest Debian Security Fixes, Update Now

A few minutes ago, the development team behind the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux computer operating system announced that new security fixes are now available for the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" release. Read more

Gorgeous Apricity OS Linux Distro Now Works on 32-bit PCs, Build 09.2016 Is Out

Softpedia was informed by Apricity OS developer Alex Gajewski that the Apricity OS 09.2016 release is now available for download and it's the first to come with a 32-bit version as well. Read more

Today in Techrights