Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Stocks Are Riding the Open-Source Comeback

Filed under
Linux

WE'VE WITNESSED SOME mythic events in tech history recently. One eye-popper was Steve Jobs and Bill Gates sharing a stage for the first time in 20 years at The Wall Street Journal's D: All Things Digital conference last month. Perhaps even more shocking than that is Microsoft's willingness — reluctant as it may be — to share a stage with the Linux community.

Long seen as a thorn in Microsoft's side, Linux is an operating system that is based on the ideas of freedom and collaboration. It opens up its code so programmers can add or change applications to suit their needs. By doing so, open source offers a level of customization that proprietary software like Windows, which keeps its code locked up, never had.

So when Microsoft teamed up with Linux provider Novell last November in an effort to make Linux and Windows more interoperable, it sent shockwaves throughout Linux circles. Microsoft has subsequently inked more partnerships with Linux providers, most recently with desktop Linux provider Linspire.

Has Microsoft drunk the open-source Kool-Aid? Not exactly. It appears that Microsoft is doing whatever it can to protect its turf, even if it means sleeping with the enemy. The open-source operating system and its software bundles, such as OpenOffice, are starting to chip away at Microsoft's precious cash cows — Windows and Office — and Microsoft is taking heed.

More Here.




More in Tux Machines

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more

Desktop Shmesktop, New Open Source Academy, and Your Own Steam Machine

Today in Linux news, Matt Asay asks if we can "please stop talking about the Linux desktop?" Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center will open a Linux certification academy in Mississippi next month. A new developmental release of Opera was announced and a new horror game has me rushing to Steam. This and more inside in tonight's Linux recap. Read more