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Safari on Linux

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Software

Monday at the WWDC Steve Jobs announced that Safari would be ported to Windows. Many people in the audience found this more shocking than the new features offered in the leopard operating system. The reasons behind the port still remain unclear.

Firefox is offered across all 3 platforms, what is stopping Safari? There are plenty of Linux users out there that use the Google search box in Firefox, and I believe that apple could make millions of dollars by releasing Safari for Linux.

But wait, does Safari already work for Linux? I installed Ubuntu and the latest version of wine to find out.

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UPDATE: Howto: Install Safari on Ubuntu with Flash!

It's already on Linux

Safari has been on Linux for years it's called Konqueror. KDE and Apple have been sharing Webkit for years now.

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/0,1000000121,39145507,00.htm

is just on of the many articles where you will find people referencing KDE and Apple Working together to refine their browsers. Both Konqueror and Safari have the same crazy quirks when rendering CSS etc.. There's no need to come to the Linux platform and if they do it will be just for cosmetic purposes.

Hi jmiahman. Just like to

Hi jmiahman.

Just like to clarify:

* Konqueror != Safari. They may use the same base rendering engine, but Safari uses Webcore which is derived: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebCore. So quite different at the end of the day.

* Nothing needs to come to the Linux platform, but the more the merrier. Vendors should make software that is cross-platform.

* I am sure there are users out there that don't like Konqueror, but would like Safari. You put a Mac OS X user on to Konqueror, they will probably feel alien. Port Safari, and they will feel at home.

* All browsers have compliance problems with their rendering engines. Safari doesn't seem to have any of these 'crazy quirks' (whatever they are), rather it was the FIRST to pass W3C's Acid2 test:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid2

* May I also mention that why just support Linux, how about us BSD users?

Why Apple ported Safari to Windows

An interesting theory as to why Apple went to the trouble of porting Safari to Windows is that it gives hackers (or "crackers," in politically correct geek terminology) time to find flaws with it, so that when the iPhone comes out, the version of Safari on it will be more robust. In other words, Apple is letting Windows users do QA for them.

If true, the possibility of a Linux or BSD port seems rather slim.

(From a personal standpoint, I find that "brushed metal" look ugly. And it doesn't let you specify which sites to specifically reject cookies from. And... In any case, while some people will love it, I doubt it's going to offer much competition to Firefox.)

developing for the iPhone

Apple probably wants to allow developers to test their Web sites on Safari so that they can be browser smoothly on the iPhone.

What is the smallest Linux

What is the smallest Linux distribution compatible with the PS3?
I would like to install Linux on my PS3 but I have a satellite internet connection. This means that I can only download small files(or iso's). Like under 500mb. Are there any free iso linux files I can get for ps3 under 500mb?

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