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Day 1 With Fedora 7

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Linux

Installing Fedora was very straight forward. After choosing my default language and keyboard layout, I was met with some partitioning options. Opting for a "custom setup", the partitioner that the Fedora installer provides leaves little to be desired for a basic install. I was able to select which disk partitions I wanted to use, which of these I wanted to format, and where I wanted each partition to be mounted. I chose to use my home partition from my Ubuntu install, and everything appeared to work well.

Moving on, I was offered to customize my package selection. Choosing to do so, I was able to select or de-select large package groups, such as games, office productivity, editors, and others. I generally like to see a more detailed and customizable approach to package selection, as openSUSE and other distros provide.

Along the install process I was also able to chose whether or not to install a boot loader.

More Here.




Hello all! I am the author

Hello all!
I am the author of this post on Just Another Tech Blog.
Thank you for submitting my writing, but I feel that the opinions I express in that post are rather unjust. It was mainly intended as a post to express my feelings about the distro right after installation. That means that some of what I say may not be accurate and be only accredited to my relative inexperience with Linux in general. I have followed up this post with a few other posts on Fedora 7 and my experiences have been greatly improving.

Just keep this in mind while reading.

Thanks!

re: Hello ... author

Yeah, we linked to the followup too.

re: Hello All

linnerd40 wrote:
That means that some of what I say may not be accurate

What's that you say? Stuff on the web or posted in a blog "might" not be accurate! Shocked I say, just shocked!

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