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switching to PCLINUX from UBUNTU week 2

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PCLOS
Ubuntu

I am now into my second week of using PCLINUX 2007 (PCLOS) and I am really enjoying it.

My biggest problem has been finding a podcast client. I had used DemocracyTV but when I tried to install it from its home page, I had problems. I tried jPodder (java based) and it sort of worked but not too well. I finally did what I should have done in the first place; I looked in the repository and I noticed kpodder and gave it a try. It actually works rather well for me. It is easy to add podcasts and select the episodes I want to download and it is working fine for me.

At one point, last week my thunderbird email client really slowed down. I tried the same fix I had used for firefox, that is about:config and then turn off ipv6, and it worked. This is not a problem casued by PCLOS as I have had this happen to me before with other distro's (Ubuntu, Knoppix, Puppy Linux, etc.).

I am a fairly heavy user, and I am amazed that the items listed above are ALL the problems I have had. It is turning out that PCLOS is rock solid.

More Here.




Re: Switching from Ubuntu to PCLinuxOS

As someone who has been principally a PCLinuxOS user for some time, I can safely say that this is the one distro that I can hand to someone on CD, regardless of that person's computer experience, and have some confidence that they will be able to install and use it without a lot of handholding. It just works.

That small "garage" distros like PCLinuxOS and Mepis can compete with the Novell/SUSE's, Red Hat/Fedora's, and 'buntus brings joy to my heart.

Of course, PCLinuxOS is limited in some ways. It's not primarily a server OS. It doesn't have the range of something like Debian. There's currently no 64-bit version (although planned). Not many languages are yet fully supported. No PPC or non AMD/Intel platform versions. It's very KDE centric. So, it's clearly not suitable for all situations and all needs.

But, in its niche, it's a wonderful distro.

Good news on the language

Good news on the language front...PCLinuxOS has an international DVD in development at mypclinuxos.com Big Grin

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