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Scorched 3D makes tank battles fun

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Gaming

Whether or not you remember the days when DOS was DOS and real geeks played Scorched Earth, a turn-based warfare game with tanks trading shots at each other until one was destroyed, you might find Scorched 3D, a modern remake of the old classic, just as addicting today as those playing the original did then. Not only that, it is the Project of the Month for May on SourceForge.net.

Scorched 3D is written in C++ and released under the GPL. It is available for the Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux platforms. You can download a binary for the platform of your choice, or grab the source code and build it yourself. I got my copy courtesy of the Ubuntu repositories. You'll want to have a graphics card capable of hardware acceleration and be running with a driver capable of exercising that capability.

The Scorched 3D startup screen offers you six choices: you can start the tutorial, start a single-player game, start a network (LAN or Internet) game, start a game server for network play, change your game setup, or view game help files as HTML -- assuming you installed them. On Ubuntu, that means installing the scorched3d-doc package as well as the game itself.

More Here.




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