Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Installing Linux to an Xbox

Filed under

Why would we want to do this you ask, well the reason I have done this is because I was short of pc's to use as Linux servers. So now I'm using my Xbox. I hardly play any games on it anymore so I figured I might as well put it to some use.

The Distro: Gentoox, a very powerful Gentoo port to the Xbox
The Xbox: Modded Crystal 1.6 with stock 8gb hard drive
Purpose: To server WebPages and files, as well as to be used as a Samba server and Ectroverse server


The method of installation I used was an FTP install directly to the E partition. If you have slayers installed follow me instructions into how to run xbe files.

For this method you will need a modded Xbox with FTP server

Firstly get

The latest version of Gentoox Home
Unzip until you have distro.rar
Unzip this to a file, you should find the following files "rootfs, swap, gentoox.xbe, initrd.gz, linuxboot.cfg & vmlinuz"

Copy these to the root of the E: drive on you're Xbox. It requires them to be here so Cromwell can boot it. Now link Evox to the gentoox.xbe in the E drive. Reboot you're xbox once these are installed. You do not require a keyboard or mouse for this. You can use the Xpad with an onscreen keyboard. However if you're using it as a server don't worry. So as I was saying, reboot the Xbox… run the Linux link you just created in Evox. You should be prompted with a resolution screen. Select you're res and boot it/. On first boot it will ask you if you wish to enable several things.

Full Article with cool pic.

More in Tux Machines

Learning The Linux File System

Before we get started, let’s avoid any confusion. There are two meanings to the term “File System” in the wonderful world of computing: First, there is the system of files and the directory structure that all of your data is stored in. Second, is the format scheme that is used to write data on mass storage devices like hard drives and SSD’s. We are going to be talking about the first kind of file system here because the average user will interact with his or her file system every time they use a computer, the format that data is written in on their storage devices is usually of little concern to them. The many different file systems that can be used on storage is really only interesting to hardware geeks and is best saved for another discussion. Now that that’s cleared up, we can press on. (Read the rest at Freedom Penguin)

today's howtos

Red Hat and Fedora

FreeNAS 10 Enters Alpha, Brings Lots of New Technologies, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

FreeNAS' Jordan Hubbard was proud to announce the other day, October 8, the release and immediate availability for download of the first Alpha build of the upcoming FreeNAS open source Network Attached Storage (NAS) solution. Read more