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Who's Afraid of Google? The New Evil Empire

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Google

One of the more significant non-events just happened – Google’s lukewarm embrace of Salesforce.com – and there’s a lot of speculation about what Google in the enterprise software market would mean. So let’s talk about what Google is really up to first: A clearer understanding of Google’s role in the overall economy will shed some light on what an alliance with Salesforce.com, or any other enterprise software vendor, would mean.

Let’s start by calling Google for what it is: a publishing company that makes money from advertising, one that is so successful that it is slowly sucking the life out of the mainstream publishing business, and along with it the profession of journalism and the role of the fourth estate in modern society.

And let’s also start by calling Google for what it isn’t: a company that will make an impact in the enterprise software space any time soon, deals with the likes of Salesforce.com notwithstanding.

Based on what it’s been able to accomplish to date, I deem this company to be the new evil empire – this from a company whose informal motto is “Don’t be Evil.” Google’s evil is more threatening than anything the original evil empire, Microsoft, has ever succeeded in doing, and in that regard Google has already topped its rival, even if it still hasn’t really made a dent in Microsoft’s core business with its free, on-demand software.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing